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public class EnumRouteConstraint<T> : IRouteConstraint
    where T : struct
{
    private static readonly Lazy<HashSet<string>> _enumNames; // <--

    static EnumRouteConstraint()
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(Resources.Error.EnumRouteConstraint.FormatWith(typeof(T).FullName));
        }

        string[] names = Enum.GetNames(typeof(T));
        _enumNames = new Lazy<HashSet<string>>(() => new HashSet<string>
        (
            names.Select(name => name), StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase
        ));
    }

    public bool Match(HttpContextBase httpContext, Route route, string parameterName, RouteValueDictionary values, RouteDirection routeDirection)
    {
        bool match = _enumNames.Value.Contains(values[parameterName].ToString());
        return match;
    }
}

Is this wrong? I would assume that this actually has a static readonly field for each of the possible EnumRouteConstraint<T> that I happen to instance.

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Sometimes its a feature, sometimes an annoyance. I wished C# had some keyword to distinguish them –  nawfal Apr 21 '13 at 5:16
    
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3 Answers 3

up vote 131 down vote accepted

It's fine to have a static field in a generic type, so long as you know that you'll really get one field per combination of type arguments. My guess is that R# is just warning you in case you weren't aware of that.

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Clear explanation, thanks ! –  Eric Ouellet Feb 27 at 20:13
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From the JetBrains wiki:

In the vast majority of cases, having a static field in a generic type is a sign of an error. The reason for this is that a static field in a generic type will not be shared among instances of different close constructed types. This means that for a generic class C<T> which has a static field X, the values of C<int>.X and C<string>.X have completely different, independent values.

In the rare cases when you do need the 'specialized' static fields, feel free to suppress the warning.

If you need to have a static field shared between instances with different generic arguments, define a non-generic base class to store your static members, then set your generic type to inherit from this type.

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This is not an error by any means. It is kind of misunderstanding of generics in C#. The easiest way to remember what generics do is the following: Generics are "blueprints" for creating classes, much like classes are "blueprints" for creating objects. (Well, this is a simplification though. You may use method generics as well.)

From this point of view MyClassRecipe<T> is not a class -- it is a recipe, a blueprint, of what your class would look like. Once you substitute T with something concrete, say int, string, etc., you get a class. It is perfectly legal to have a static member (field, property, method) declared in your newly created class (as in any other class) and no sign of any error here. It would be somewhat suspicious, at first sight, if you declare static MyStaticProperty<T> Property { get; set; } within your class blueprint, but this is legal too. Only your property would be parameterized, or templated, as well.

No wonder in VB statics are called shared. In this case however, you should be aware that such "shared" members are shared among class' instances, not among different classes produced by substituting <T> with something else.

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