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This question is the inverse of this question.

Given a nested hash like

{
    :a => {
       :b => {:c => 1, :d => 2},
       :e => 3,
    },
    :f => 4,
}

what is the best way to convert it into a flat hash like

{
    [:a, :b, :c] => 1,
    [:a, :b, :d] => 2,
    [:a, :e] => 3,
    [:f] => 4,
}
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3  
So you want an array of keys in order that lead to a value? –  Linuxios Mar 10 '12 at 16:59
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another way:

def flat_hash(h,f=[],g={})
  return g.update({ f=>h }) unless h.is_a? Hash
  h.each { |k,r| flat_hash(r,f+[k],g) }
  g
end

h = { :a => { :b => { :c => 1,
                      :d => 2 },
              :e => 3 },
      :f => 4 }

flat_hash(h) #=> {[:a, :b, :c]=>1, [:a, :b, :d]=>2, [:a, :e]=>3, [:f]=>4}
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This is very fast. –  sawa May 30 at 15:06
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Very similar to Adiel Mittmann's solution

def flat_hash(h, k = [])
  new_hash = {}
  h.each_pair do |key, val|
    if val.is_a?(Hash)
      new_hash.merge!(flat_hash(val, k + [key]))
    else
      new_hash[k + [key]] = val
    end
  end
  new_hash
end

Edit: Refactored for elegance. Should be almost as fast.

def flat_hash(hash, k = [])
  return {k => hash} unless hash.is_a?(Hash)
  hash.inject({}){ |h, v| h.merge! flat_hash(v[-1], k + [v[0]]) }
end
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This one ran the fastest. Thanks. –  sawa Mar 10 '12 at 17:38
    
@sawa: Just a tip for the future: If you want a fast solution, mention this in the question next time. Usually the main criterion in dynamic languages like Python or Ruby is elegancy and conciseness. If you specifically ask for performance as well, you could get much better suited answers :) –  Niklas B. Mar 10 '12 at 17:43
1  
@sawa: refactored for elegance. –  Kyle Mar 10 '12 at 19:18
    
@Kyle One thing that was good about your earlier code was that it can be redefined as a method on Hash. The rewritten one cannot. –  sawa Mar 11 '12 at 1:56
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My attempt:

def flatten_hash(h)
  return { [] => h } unless h.is_a?(Hash)
  Hash[h.map { |a,v1| flatten_hash(v1).map { |b,v2| [[a] + b, v2] } }.flatten(1)]
end

Sorry for the bad variables names, had to fit it in one line.

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This is not an attempt to give you the best way to do it, but it is a way :P

def flatten(hash)
  return {[] => hash} if !hash.is_a?(Hash)
  map = {}
  hash.each_pair do |key1, value1|
    flatten(value1).each_pair do |key2, value2|
      map[[key1] + key2] = value2
    end
  end
  return map
end

It works for your example, producing this result:

{[:a, :b, :c]=>1, [:a, :b, :d]=>2, [:a, :e]=>3, [:f]=>4}

It may not produce the result you expect if there are empty hashes.

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A functional approach:

def recursive_flatten(hash, acc_keys = [])
  hash.flat_map do |key, value|
    if value.is_a?(Hash)
      recursive_flatten(value, acc_keys + [key])
    else
      {acc_keys + [key] => value}
    end
  end.reduce(:merge)
end

Another (a bit more verbose because we need an auxiliar proc, but more orthodox):

def recursive_flatten(hash)
  get_pairs = proc do |hash2, acc_keys|
    hash2.flat_map do |key, value|
      if value.is_a?(Hash)
        get_pairs.call(value, acc_keys + [key])
      else
        [[acc_keys + [key], value]]
      end
    end
  end
  Hash[get_pairs.call(hash, [])]
end
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