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Is there a way to apply a two-dimensional array to an object?

Like this:

var myArray = [[0,1],[2,3]];
someObject.apply(null,myArray);

It seems to apply only the first inner array :-/

Why is that?

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The apply method is defined on the prototype of functions. Not objects. What are you trying to achieve? –  Aadit M Shah Mar 10 '12 at 17:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, since your question was so uninformative I'm going to assume a lot of stuff. Firstly, I'm going to assume that someObject is a function. Next I'm going to assume that it has only one formal parameter like @Adam pointed out. So this is what I assume your code looks like:

function someObject(a) {
    alert(a);                   // were you expecting [[0,1],[2,3]]?
}

var myArray = [[0,1],[2,3]];
someObject.apply(null,myArray);

This is what I think you want instead:

function someObject() {
    alert(arguments);           // now it alerts [[0,1],[2,3]]
}

var myArray = [[0,1],[2,3]];
someObject.apply(null,myArray);

Remember, when you apply arguments to a function you pass it the arguments as an array. It's kind of like calling the function as follows:

function someObject() {
    alert(arguments);
}

var myArray = [[0,1],[2,3]];
someObject(myArray[0], myArray[1]);

Of course, it also assigns the function a custom this pointer.

Edit: Looking back at your code I think you might have intended to use call instead of apply. The method call allows you to pass the arguments to the function as separate arguments instead of an array of arguments. So your code would look:

function someObject(a, b) {
    alert(a);                  // now a is [[0,1],[2,3]]
    alert(b);                  // b is 5 and so on
}

var myArray = [[0,1],[2,3]];
someObject.call(null,myArray,5);
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Got it :-) Thanks –  Zach Weyman Mar 10 '12 at 18:01
    
+1 for mentioning call –  Martin Hansen Mar 10 '12 at 18:35

You code works..

With that code you pass two arguments to the someObject function, [0,1] and [2,3]

According to this fiddle that is exactly what happens. http://jsfiddle.net/BgVxQ/

Edit: If you have an unknown number of arguments, use the arguments variable available inside the function to get hold of them. If you have a fixed number of arguments, then it's often easier to declare them

function someObject(parameter1, parameter2){
    //Do stuff
}

That way you don't need to manually extract them from arguments

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var myArray = [[0,1],[2,3]];
someObject.apply(null,[myArray]);
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1  
That doesn't really make any sense because myArray is already an array. Also the OP wants to pass the inner arrays as arguments and not the outer array. –  Aadit M Shah Mar 10 '12 at 17:40

According to the docs, apply takes an array of arguments and passes them to your function. So, you need to place myArray inside an array that will be unpacked to form the argument to someObject:

var myArray = [[0, 1],[2, 3]];
someObject.apply(null, [myArray]);

In the code you posted, the function someObject was receiving two arguments: [0, 1] and [2, 3]. This is legal because JavaScript allows functions to be called with a number of arguments that differs from the number of formal parameters. But because there were more arguments than formal parameters, the second argument ([2, 3]) was lost and you only saw the first ([0, 1]).

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thanks mate! works like a charme –  Zach Weyman Mar 10 '12 at 17:37
    
JavaScript doesn't lose any arguments. What you're trying to say is that the function someObject has only one named parameter and hence only [0, 1] can be accessed. That is wrong. You can use the free variable arguments in the function to access all the values passed to the function regardless of the function prototype. –  Aadit M Shah Mar 10 '12 at 17:39
1  
It's already an array, no need to pack it in another one. –  Martin Hansen Mar 10 '12 at 17:39
1  
@ZachWeyman if that "works like a charm", you are likely using only one named parameter in your someObject function, see the edit of my answer above. You probably should be using the arguments variable –  Martin Hansen Mar 10 '12 at 17:48

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