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Given the following XML-compliant HTML:

<div>
 <a>a1</a>
 <b>b1</b>
</div>

<div>
 <b>b2</b>
</div>

<div>
 <a>a3</a>
 <b>b3</b>
 <c>c3</c>
</div>

doing //a will return:

[a1,a3]

The problem with above is that the third column data is now in second place, when A is not found it is completely skipped.

how can you express an xpath to get all A elements which will return:

[a1, null, a3]

same case for //c, I wonder if it's possible to get

[null, null, c3]

UPDATE: consider another scenario where are no common parents <div>.

<h1>heading1</h1>
 <a>a1</a>
 <b>b1</b>


<h1>heading2</h1>
 <b>b2</b>


<h1>heading3</h1>
 <a>a3</a>
 <b>b3</b>
 <c>c3</c>

UPDATE: I am now able to use XSLT as well.

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps XPath is not the way to go for this. Perhaps you want to use something more robust such as JAXB. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 10 '12 at 18:19
    
im open to alternatives to xpath. how can you express this with jaxb? –  KJW Mar 10 '12 at 18:25
1  
This question -- with the update is undefined. Please, edit and provide a new source XML document that corresponds to the edit. Without providing a correct XML document, how can you expect people to guess what you had in mind? Because you don't provide an XML document corresponding to your latest update, I am inclined to think that you don't know what you are speaking about. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 16 '12 at 2:43
1  
so just imagine the original html (NOT XML document) code above without the <div> elements, how would you use xpath to return the expected results described in this question. Please rekindle your memories at our previous discussion on using xpath for html documents: stackoverflow.com/questions/4250925/… –  KJW Mar 16 '12 at 2:46
1  
+1 to @DimitreNovatchev and Kirill Polishchuk, I don't understand what a "missing element" means when there is no common div parent. Are a, b and c just randomly distributed throughout the document, but if there's less than 3 of them inside one parent node, then one is missing? –  Lev Levitsky Mar 16 '12 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+50

There is no null value in XPath. There's a semi-related question here which also explains this: http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t686805-xpath-query-to-return-null-values.html

Realistically, you've got three options:

  1. Don't use XPath at all.
  2. Use this: //a | //div[not(a)], which would return the div element if there was no a within it, and have your Java code handle any div's returned as 'no a element present'. Depending on the context, this may even allow you to output something more useful if required, as you'll have access to the entire contents of the div, for example an error 'no a element found in div (some identifier)'.
  3. Preprocess your XML with an XSLT that inserts a elements in any div element that does not already have one with a suitable default.

Your second case is a little tricky, and to be honest, I'd actually recommend not using XPath for it at all, but it can be done:

//a | //h1[not(following-sibling::a) or generate-id(.) != generate-id(following-sibling::a[1]/preceding-sibling::h1[1])]

This will match any a elements, or any h1 elements where no following a element exists before the next h1 element, or the end of the document. As Dimitre pointed out though, this only works if you're using it from within XSLT, as generate-id is an XSLT function.

If you're not using it from within XLST, you can use this rather contrived formula:

//a | //h1[not(following-sibling::a) or count(. | preceding-sibling::h1) != count(following-sibling::a[1]/preceding-sibling::h1)]

It works by matching h1 elements where the count of itself and all preceding h1 elements is not the same as the count of all h1 elements preceding the next a. There may be a more efficient way of doing it in XPath, but if it's going to get any more contrived than that, I'd definitely recommend not using XPath at all.

share|improve this answer
    
with teh case of //a | //div[not(a)], would that run the left side first and then the right side of the | –  KJW Mar 16 '12 at 19:51
1  
No, nodes should be returned in document order. You'd get <a>a1</a>, <div><b>b2</b></div>, <a>a3</a> –  Flynn1179 Mar 16 '12 at 19:56
    
thank you that answers the first part of the question which I was originally more concerned about. but any ideas on the second example up there? –  KJW Mar 16 '12 at 20:01
    
okay this has 8 votes...I think it's fair to choose this as an answer, I've read all the other answers but the xpath expressions listed on her is sufficient. I upvoted all the other answers below I think they are equally good but I think it's fair to say, Flynn1179 was the first to suggest using the not() function so at the end of the day I am using his solution. I will use the xslt solutions in the near future as well. –  KJW Mar 22 '12 at 7:39

Solution for the first problem:

This XPath expression:

    /*/div/a
|
    /*/div[not(a)]

When evaluated against the following XML document:

<t>
    <div>
        <a>a1</a>
        <b>b1</b>
    </div>
    <div>
        <b>b2</b>
    </div>
    <div>
        <a>a3</a>
        <b>b3</b>
        <c>c3</c>
    </div>
</t>

selects the following three nodes (a, div, a):

<a>a1</a>
<div>
    <b>b2</b>
</div>
<a>a3</a>

In your java array any selected non-a element should be treated as (or replaced by) null.


Here is one solution to the second problem:

Use these XPath expressions for selecting the a elements from each group:

For the first group:

/*/h1[1]
   /following-sibling::a
      [not(/*/h1[2])
     or
       count(.|/*/h1[2]/preceding-sibling::a)
      =
       count(/*/h1[2]/preceding-sibling::a)
      ]

For the second group:

/*/h1[2]
   /following-sibling::a
      [not(/*/h1[3])
     or
       count(.|/*/h1[3]/preceding-sibling::a)
      =
       count(/*/h1[3]/preceding-sibling::a)
      ]

And for the 3rd group:

/*/h1[3]
   /following-sibling::a
      [not(/*/h1[4])
     or
      count(.|/*/h1[4]/preceding-sibling::a)
      =
       count(/*/h1[4]/preceding-sibling::a)
      ]

In case that:

count(/*/h1)

is $cnt,

generate $cnt such expressions (for i = 1 to $cnt) and evaluate all of them. The selected nodes by each of them either contains an a element, or not. If the $k-th group (nodes selected from evaluating the $k-th expression) contains an a, use its string value to generate the $k-th item of the wanted array -- otherwise generate null for the $k-th item of the wanted array.

Here is an XSLT - based verification of the above XPath expressions:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
   <xsl:variable name="vGroup1" select=
   "/*/h1[1]
       /following-sibling::a
          [not(/*/h1[2])
         or
           count(.|/*/h1[2]/preceding-sibling::a)
          =
           count(/*/h1[2]/preceding-sibling::a)
          ]
   "/>

   <xsl:variable name="vGroup2" select=
   "/*/h1[2]
       /following-sibling::a
          [not(/*/h1[3])
         or
           count(.|/*/h1[3]/preceding-sibling::a)
          =
           count(/*/h1[3]/preceding-sibling::a)
          ]
   "/>

   <xsl:variable name="vGroup3" select=
   "/*/h1[3]
       /following-sibling::a
          [not(/*/h1[4])
         or
          count(.|/*/h1[4]/preceding-sibling::a)
          =
           count(/*/h1[4]/preceding-sibling::a)
          ]
   "/>

 Group1:  "<xsl:copy-of select="$vGroup1"/>"

 Group2:  "<xsl:copy-of select="$vGroup2"/>"

 Group3:  "<xsl:copy-of select="$vGroup3"/>"

 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document (no complete and well-formed XML document has been provided by the OP !!!):

<t>
    <h1>heading1</h1>
    <a>a1</a>
    <b>b1</b>

    <h1>heading2</h1>
    <b>b2</b>

    <h1>heading3</h1>
    <a>a3</a>
    <b>b3</b>
    <c>c3</c>
</t>

the three XPath expressions are evaluated and the selected nodes by each of them are output:

 Group1:  "<a>a1</a>"

 Group2:  ""

 Group3:  "<a>a3</a>"

Explanation:

We use the well-known Kayessian formula for the intersection of two nodesets:

$ns1[count(. | $ns2) = count($ns2)]

The result of evaluating this expression contains exactly the nodes that belong both to the nodeset $ns1 and the nodeset $ns2.

What remains is to substitute $ns1 and $ns2 with expressions that are relevant to the problem.

We substitute $ns1 by:

/*/h1[1]
    /following-sibling::a

and we substitute $ns2 by:

/*/h1[2]
    /preceding-sibling::a

In other words, the a elements that are between the first and second /*/h1 are the intersection of the a elements that are following siblings of /*/h1[1] and the a elements that are preceding siblings of /*/h1[2].

This expression is only problematic for the a elements that follow the last of the /*/h1 elements. this is why we add an additional predicate, that checks for non-existence of a next /*/h1 element and or this with the following boolean expressions.

Finally, as a guiding example for a Java implementation here is a complete XSLT transformation, which does something similar -- produces a serialized array, and can be mechanically translated to a corresponding Java solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
         xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
         xmlns:my="my:my">
         <xsl:output method="text"/>

         <my:null>null</my:null>
         <my:Q>"</my:Q>

         <xsl:variable name="vNull" select="document('')/*/my:null"/>
         <xsl:variable name="vQ" select="document('')/*/my:Q"/>

         <xsl:template match="/">
           <xsl:variable name="vGroup1" select=
           "/*/h1[1]
               /following-sibling::a
                  [not(/*/h1[2])
                 or
                   count(.|/*/h1[2]/preceding-sibling::a)
                  =
                   count(/*/h1[2]/preceding-sibling::a)
                  ]
           "/>

           <xsl:variable name="vGroup2" select=
           "/*/h1[2]
               /following-sibling::a
                  [not(/*/h1[3])
                 or
                   count(.|/*/h1[3]/preceding-sibling::a)
                  =
                   count(/*/h1[3]/preceding-sibling::a)
                  ]
           "/>

           <xsl:variable name="vGroup3" select=
           "/*/h1[3]
               /following-sibling::a
                  [not(/*/h1[4])
                 or
                  count(.|/*/h1[4]/preceding-sibling::a)
                  =
                   count(/*/h1[4]/preceding-sibling::a)
                  ]
           "/>

         [<xsl:value-of select=
          "concat($vQ[$vGroup1/self::a[1]],
                  $vGroup1/self::a[1],
                  $vQ[$vGroup1/self::a[1]],
                  $vNull[not($vGroup1/self::a[1])])"/>
          <xsl:text>,</xsl:text>

         <xsl:value-of select=
          "concat($vQ[$vGroup2/self::a[1]],
                  $vGroup2/self::a[1],
                  $vQ[$vGroup2/self::a[1]],
                  $vNull[not($vGroup2/self::a[1])])"/>
          <xsl:text>,</xsl:text>

         <xsl:value-of select=
          "concat($vQ[$vGroup3/self::a[1]],
                  $vGroup3/self::a[1],
                  $vQ[$vGroup3/self::a[1]],
                  $vNull[not($vGroup3/self::a[1])])"/>]
         </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the same XML document (above), the wanted, correct result is produced:

     ["a1",null,"a3"]

Update2:

Now the OP has added that he can use an XSLT solution. Here is one:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
         xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
         xmlns:my="my:my" exclude-result-prefixes="xsl">
         <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

         <xsl:key name="kFollowing" match="a"
              use="generate-id(preceding-sibling::h1[1])"/>

         <my:null/>
         <xsl:variable name="vNull" select="document('')/*/my:null"/>

         <xsl:template match="/*">
           <xsl:copy-of select=
           "h1/following-sibling::a[1]
          |
            h1[not(key('kFollowing', generate-id()))]"/>

           =============================================

           <xsl:apply-templates select="h1"/>

         </xsl:template>

         <xsl:template match="h1">
           <xsl:variable name="vAsInGroup" select=
               "key('kFollowing', generate-id())"/>
           <xsl:copy-of select="$vAsInGroup[1] | $vNull[not($vAsInGroup)]"/>
         </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

This transformation implements two different solutions. The difference is in what element is used to represent "null". In the first case it is the h1 element. This isn't recommended, because any h1 already has its own meaning which is different from "representing null". The second solution uses a special my:null element to represent null.

When this transformation is applied on the same XML document as above:

<t>
        <h1>heading1</h1>
        <a>a1</a>
        <b>b1</b>

        <h1>heading2</h1>
        <b>b2</b>

        <h1>heading3</h1>
        <a>a3</a>
        <b>b3</b>
        <c>c3</c>
</t>

each of the two XPath expressions (containing XSLT key() references) are evaluated and the selected nodes are output (above and below "========", respectively):

<a>a1</a>
<h1>heading2</h1>
<a>a3</a>

           =============================================

           <a>a1</a>
<my:null xmlns:my="my:my" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"/>
<a>a3</a>

Note on performance:

Because keys are used, this solution will be significantly more efficient when more than one search is made -- for example, when the corresponding arrays for a, b, and c need to be produced.

share|improve this answer
1  
@DimitreNovatchev, this is a very good detailed answer, however it does not answer the first part of the question. I changed the question to accept XSLT solution. No one is against you here Dimitre, it's obvious you know a great deal and you have my respect, but perhaps it's somehow the slight condescending/passive agressiveness whether intended or not that really degrades the quality of your answers, I never question the correctness of them but your attitude can certainly rub off the wrong way at times, but it's all good, at the time I added the second part, it seemed to me a good idea. –  KJW Mar 17 '12 at 16:48
    
Kim Jong Woo: With all due respect, it still isn't clear from your question exactly what is wanted. Forget about the time people need to guess what is actually wanted, but you'll get not the best answers, as you would, if the question is stated unambiguously. The fact is that a good expert like Kirill has deleted his answer and never returned back -- think of this, this probably means something. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 17 '12 at 16:54
1  
Still doesn't address the first part of the question. –  KJW Mar 17 '12 at 17:31
    
Kim Jong Woo: What first part? You reverted from the first part, causing two people to delete their good answers, and now asking for "the first part" ??? What is "the question"? You never explained this unambiguously. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 17 '12 at 18:07
2  
Deleting most of this conversation, @Flynn, Dimitre. Please refrain from using comments to discuss voting. Information on voters is private for a reason, and this sort of useless dialog is a pretty big part of that reason. –  Shog9 Mar 17 '12 at 23:02

I suggest you use the following, which might be rewritten to an xsl:function where the parent node name (here: div) is parametrized.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

<xsl:template match="/">
    <root>
        <aList><xsl:copy-of select="$divIncludingNulls//a"/></aList>
        <bList><xsl:copy-of select="$divIncludingNulls//b"/></bList>
        <cList><xsl:copy-of select="$divIncludingNulls//c"/></cList>
    </root>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:variable name="divChild" select="distinct-values(//div/*/name())"/>

<xsl:variable name="divIncludingNulls">
    <xsl:for-each select="//div">
        <xsl:variable name="divElt" select="."/>
        <div>
            <xsl:for-each select="$divChild">
                <xsl:variable name="divEltvalue" select="$divElt/*[name()=current()]"/>
                <xsl:element name="{.}">
                    <xsl:choose>
                        <xsl:when test="$divEltvalue"><xsl:value-of select="$divEltvalue"/></xsl:when>
                        <xsl:otherwise>null</xsl:otherwise>
                    </xsl:choose>
                </xsl:element>
            </xsl:for-each>
       </div>
    </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:variable>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Applied to

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
    <div>
     <a>a1</a>
     <b>b1</b>
    </div>

    <div>
     <b>b2</b>
    </div>

    <div>
     <a>a3</a>
     <b>b3</b>
     <c>c3</c>
    </div>
</root>

the output is

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
    <aList>
        <a>a1</a>
        <a>null</a>
        <a>a3</a>
    </aList>
    <bList>
        <b>b1</b>
        <b>b2</b>
        <b>b3</b>
    </bList>
    <cList>
        <c>null</c>
        <c>null</c>
        <c>c3</c>
    </cList>
</root>
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