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I'm trying to understand why I can iterate along the string. What I see in the documentation is:

One method needs to be defined for container objects to provide iteration support:

container.__iter__()

Return an iterator object. The object is required to support the iterator protocol described below. If a container supports different types of iteration, additional methods can be provided to specifically request iterators for those iteration types. (An example of an object supporting multiple forms of iteration would be a tree structure which supports both breadth-first and depth-first traversal.) This method corresponds to the tp_iter slot of the type structure for Python objects in the Python/C API.

The iterator objects themselves are required to support the following two methods, which together form the iterator protocol:

iterator.__iter__()

Return the iterator object itself. This is required to allow both containers and iterators to be used with the for and in statements. This method corresponds to the tp_iter slot of the type structure for Python objects in the Python/C API.

iterator.next()

Return the next item from the container. If there are no further items, raise the StopIteration exception. This method corresponds to the tp_iternext slot of the type structure for Python objects in the Python/C API.

But...

>>> dir('aa')
['__add__', '__class__', '__contains__', '__delattr__', '__doc__',
 '__eq__', '__format__', '__ge__', '__getattribute__', '__getitem__',
 '__getnewargs__', '__getslice__', '__gt__', '__hash__', '__init__',
 '__le__', '__len__', '__lt__', '__mod__', '__mul__', '__ne__',
 '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__rmod__',
 '__rmul__', '__setattr__', '__sizeof__', '__str__', '__subclasshook__',
 '_formatter_field_name_split', '_formatter_parser', 'capitalize',
 'center', 'count', 'decode', 'encode', 'endswith', 'expandtabs',
 'find', 'format', 'index', 'isalnum', 'isalpha', 'isdigit', 'islower',
 'isspace', 'istitle', 'isupper', 'join', 'ljust', 'lower', 'lstrip',
 'partition', 'replace', 'rfind', 'rindex', 'rjust', 'rpartition',
 'rsplit', 'rstrip', 'split', 'splitlines', 'startswith', 'strip',
 'swapcase', 'title', 'translate', 'upper', 'zfill']

I don't see here any __iter__() or next(). So why does it work?

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Although I doubt it's relevant here, don't put too much trust into dir in such cases. As the docs say: "Because dir() is supplied primarily as a convenience for use at an interactive prompt, it tries to supply an interesting set of names more than it tries to supply a rigorously or consistently defined set of names, and its detailed behavior may change across releases. For example, metaclass attributes are not in the result list when the argument is a class." –  delnan Mar 10 '12 at 18:47
6  
just to make things clear. str instances do implement __iter__ as of python 3.2 –  soulcheck Mar 10 '12 at 18:49
    
My code was tested on 2.7.2. –  Adam Mar 10 '12 at 19:01
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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Iterators were new in Python 2.2. The old method was the sequence protocol (implements __getitem__ with 0-based indices) and still works.

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