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Here is an interesting jsfiddle.

In Firefox:

  1. Run the fiddle
  2. Click in text input
  3. Click somewhere else. Should say "1 blurs".
  4. Click in the text input again.
  5. ALT-TAB to another window. Fiddle should now say "2 blurs".

In Chrome, at step 5, it says "3 blurs". Two separate "blur" events are fired when the whole browser loses focus. This is of interest because it means that it's not safe to assume, in a "blur" handler, that the element actually had focus just before the event was dispatched; that is, that the loss of focus — the transition from "being in focus" to "not being in focus" — is the reason for the event. When two "blur" events are generated, that condition is not satisfied during the handling of the second event, as the element is already not in focus.

So is this just a bug? Is there a way to tell that a "blur" event is bogus?

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1  
Also happens when you just press Tab to focus the wrench menu, or focus the address bar (basically focusing everything outside the page)... Doesn't seem correct to me. –  pimvdb Mar 10 '12 at 20:40
    
This is a question for google-chrome developers not Stackoverflow. (IMO) –  gdoron Mar 10 '12 at 20:41
    
Well @gdoron that will be true if nobody out there knows a way to either detect the redundant blur, or to somehow prevent it. I agree that it seems unlikely for there to be a solution, but there are a lot of smart people here :-) –  Pointy Mar 10 '12 at 20:43
1  
It doesn't seem to happen in Safari. –  pimvdb Mar 10 '12 at 20:50
    
@pimvdb ah ok thanks a lot for checking for me :-) I don't have a Windows VM on the machine I'm using now, and I don't have a Mac at all. I should try the Android browser. –  Pointy Mar 10 '12 at 20:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The reason it is firing twice is because of window.onblur. The window blurring triggers a blur event on all elements in that window as part of the way javascript's capturing/bubbling process. All you need to do is test the event target for being the window.

var blurCount = 0;
var isTargetWindow = false;
$(window).blur(function(e){
    console.log(e.target);
    isTargetWindow = true;
});
$(window).focus(function(){
    isTargetWindow = false;
});
$('input').blur(function(e) {
    if(!isTargetWindow){         
       $('div').text(++blurCount + ' blurs');
    }
    console.log(e.target);
});

http://jsfiddle.net/pDYsM/4/

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1  
I'm not sure it's really any less complicated, but it does seem to indicate that the behavior is not a bug. –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 10 '12 at 21:44
    
Maybe its not less complicated, it just seemed that way to me reading it. I am editing my statement to reflect that. Yeah its not a bug, its the way its supposed to work. The other benefit of my method is that its completely cross browser compatible. –  Fresheyeball Mar 10 '12 at 21:46
    
Why are you using a flag and not checking who is the target in the blur event??? it could be a lot more simple answer. –  gdoron Mar 10 '12 at 21:48
    
this may be a weird jQuery thing, but using .blur alone shows the target as 'input' twice. Hooking a separate window blur function is the only way I know to get that as the target. Also also, we need to make sure the flag is reset on window focus, as we cannot reliably do that in input.blur. There may be a better way here to do this than a flag, but I have not gotten it to work. –  Fresheyeball Mar 10 '12 at 21:53
    
Well that sort-of makes sense, but it definitely does not happen that way in Firefox. That makes me wonder whether I can check the event target ... –  Pointy Mar 10 '12 at 22:36

This probably isn't what you want to hear, but the only way to do it seems to be to manually track whether the element is focused or not. For example (fiddle here):

var blurCount = 0;
document.getElementsByTagName('input')[0].onblur = function(e) {
    if (!e) e = window.event;
    console.log('blur', e);
    if (!(e.target || e.srcElement)['data-focused']) return;
    (e.target || e.srcElement)['data-focused'] = false;
    document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0].innerHTML = (++blurCount + ' blurs');
};
document.getElementsByTagName('input')[0].onfocus = function(e) {
    if (!e) e = window.event;
    console.log('focus', e);
    (e.target || e.srcElement)['data-focused'] = true;
};

Interestingly, I couldn't get this to work in jQuery (fiddle here) ... I really don't use jQuery much, maybe I'm doing something wrong here?

var blurCount = 0;
$('input').blur(function(e) {
    console.log('blur', e);
    if (!(e.target || e.srcElement)['data-focused']) return;
    (e.target || e.srcElement)['data-focused'] = false;
    $('div').innerHTML = (++blurCount + ' blurs');
});
$('input').focus(function(e) {
    console.log('focus', e);
    (e.target || e.srcElement)['data-focused'] = true;
});

You could also try comparing the event's target with document.activeElement. This example will ignore the alt+tab blur events, and the blur events resulting from clicking on Chrome's... chrome. This could be useful depending on the situation. If the user alt+tabs back into Chrome, it's as if the box never lost focus (fiddle).

var blurCount = 0;
document.getElementsByTagName('input')[0].onblur = function(e) {
    if (!e) e = window.event;
    console.log('blur', e, document.activeElement, (e.target || e.srcElement));
    if ((e.target || e.srcElement) == document.activeElement) return;
    document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0].innerHTML = (++blurCount + ' blurs');
};​
​
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Yes this is basically what I was falling back to, but it raises the question of whether I should trust the "focus" event too :-) –  Pointy Mar 10 '12 at 21:01
    
@Pointy timeStamp of such doubled events would be very close, but I'm afraid, one cannot rely on this. –  kirilloid Mar 10 '12 at 21:05
    
@Pointy I bet you could do some kind of CSS :focus hack, but that sounds even worse. –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 10 '12 at 21:15
    
@GGG the pure js method will break in ie8- as they events are window.event instead of being passed into the relevant function. –  Fresheyeball Mar 10 '12 at 21:42
1  
@Fresheyeball Yeah, good point. You know it and I know it and the OP knows it, but I should probably add it for posterity. –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 10 '12 at 21:47

This is confirmed Chrome bug. See the Chromium Issue Tracker

The workaround is in the accepted answer.

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Skip 2nd blur:

var secondBlur = false;
this.onblur = function(){
    if(secondBlur)return;
    secondBlur = true;
    //do whatever
}
this.onfocus = function(){
    secondBlur = false;    
    //do whatever
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a very narrow solution. Who's to say that the input should only blur once for the life of the page? What if the user updates the input, tabs away, click back in, then update again and tab. –  Ali Cheaito Oct 18 '13 at 17:32

I'm on Chrome Version 30.0.1599.101 m on Windows 7 and this issue appears to have been fixed.

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I am experiencing the same and the above posts make sense as to why. In my case I just wanted to know if at least one blur event had occurred. As a result I found that just returning from my blur function solved my issue and prevented the subsequent event from firing.

   function handleEditGroup(id) {
        var groupLabelObject = $('#' + id);
        var originalText = groupLabelObject.text();

        groupLabelObject.attr('contenteditable', true)
            .focus().blur(function () {
                $(this).removeAttr('contenteditable');
                $(this).text($(this).text().substr(0, 60));

                if ($(this).text() != originalText) {
                    alert("Change Found");
                    return; //<--- Added this Return.
                }
            });
    }
share|improve this answer
    
A return at that point in your function would make no difference at all, since the function would naturally return at that point anyway. –  Pointy Dec 6 '14 at 14:36

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