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I am trying to measure the number of cycles it takes my CPU to perform a specific instruction (one that should take one CPU cycle), and the output must be in cycle-lengths (The time it takes the CPU to complete one cycle). So first of all, my CPU is 2.1GHz, so that means that one cycle-length unit on my computer is 1/2100, right? Also - I am using getTimeOfDay to measure time in microseconds and I calculate the average of 1,000,000 iterations. So if I'm not mistaken my desired output must be result*2100 (in order to get it in cycle lengths). Am I right? Thanks!

P.S Don't know if it matters, but I'm writing in cpp

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2  
How many clock cycles do you think getTimeOfDay() takes? Also, why do you want to know this information? You can likely look-up the number of cycles required per instruction somewhere on the Intel site (or whichever manufacturer produces the chip your analyzing.) Trying to do this yoruself is going to be impossible. –  dlev Mar 10 '12 at 21:07
    
I think the only meaningful measure of performance is Time to perform an operation (not the cycles). Both time and cycles taken depends on CPU/Machine architecture and also your own program (e.g. how many "long" jumps it does in memory). However, time is what most people will notice. –  akhisp Mar 10 '12 at 21:10
    
@KerrekSB, make it an answer. simple but correct. –  Johan Lundberg Mar 10 '12 at 21:20
    
@JohanLundberg: OK, done! –  Kerrek SB Mar 10 '12 at 21:25
    
I rephrased my question, hope it makes more sense now –  yotamoo Mar 10 '12 at 21:29

3 Answers 3

I believe you have some been misinformed about a few things.

In modern terms clock speed is an indication of speed, not an actual measure of speed - so there is no reasonable way to estimate how long a single instruction may take.

Your question is based on the assumption that all instructions are equal - they most certainly aren't, some CPU instructions get interpreted as sequences of micro-instructions on some architectures, and on others the timings may change.

Additionally, you can't safely assume that on modern architectures that a repeated instruction will perform the same way, this depends on data and instruction caches, pipelines and branch prediction.

The resolution of getTimeOfDay isn't anything like accurate enough to estimate the length of time required to measure single instructions, even CPU clock cycle counters (TSC on x86) are not sufficient.

Furthermore, your operating system is a major source of error in estimation of such timings, context switches, power management, machine load and interrupts all have a huge impact. But even on a true hard real-time operating system (QNX or VxWorks), such measurements are still difficult, and require time and tools, as well as the expertise to interpret the results. On a General Purpose Operating System (windows or a basic Linux), you've got little to no hope of getting accurate measurements)

The computational overhead and error of reading and storing the CPU cycle counts will also tend to dwarf the time required for one instruction. At minimum, I suggest you consider grouping several hundred or thousand instructions together.

On deterministic architectures (1 cycle = 1 instruction) with no caches, like a PIC chip, you can do exactly what you suggest by using the clock multiplier, but even then to validate your measurements you would probably need a logic analyser (ie. you need to do this in hardware).

In short, this is an extremely hard problem.

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The CPU contains a cycle counter which you can read with a bit of inline assembly:

static inline uint64_t get_cycles()
{
    uint64_t n;
    __asm__ __volatile__ ("rdtsc" : "=A"(n));
    return n;
}

If you measure the cycle count for 1, 2 and 3 million iterations of your operation, you ought to be able to interpolate the cost of one, but be sure to also measure "empty" loops to remove the cost of the looping:

{
    unsigned int n, m = get_cycles();
    for (unsigned int n = 0; n != 1000000; ++n)
    {
        // (compiler barrier)
    }
    n = get_cycles();

    // cost of loop: n - m
}

{
    unsigned int n, m = get_cycles();
    for (unsigned int n = 0; n != 1000000; ++n)
    {
        my_operation();
    }
    n = get_cycles();

    // cost of 1000000 operations: n - m - cost of loop
}

// repeat for 2000000, 3000000.
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I am trying to measure the time it takes my computer to perform a simple instruction

If that's the case, the key isn't even the most accurate time function you can find. I bet none have the resolution necessary to provide a meaningful result.

The key is to increase your sample count.

So instead of doing something like:

start = tik();
instruction();
end = tok();
time = end - start;

do

start = tik();
for ( 1..10000 )
   instruction();
end = tok();
time = (end - start) / 10000;

This will provide more accurate results, and the error caused by the measuring mechanism will be negligeable.

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