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In querying an API that has a paginated list of unknown length I found myself doing essentially

def fetch_one(self, n):
    data = json.load(urlopen(url_template % n))
    if data is None:
        self.finished = True
        return
    for row in data:
        if row_is_weird(row):
            self.finished = True
            return
        yield prepare(row)

def work(self):
    n = 1
    self.finished = False
    while not self.finished:
        consume(self.fetch_one(n))
        n += 1

the split between work and fetch_one makes it very easy to test, but the signalling via instance variables means I can't have more than one work going on at the same time, which sucks. I came up with what I think is a cleaner solution, but it involves an iterator with two "done" states, and I have no idea what to call it. I'm sure this pattern exists elsewhere, so I'd appreciate pointers (or reasons why this is stupid):

class Thing(object):
    def __init__(self, gen):
        self.gen = gen
        self.finished = False

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def __next__(self):
        try:
            v = next(self.gen)
        except StopThisThing:
            self.finished = True
            raise StopIteration
        else:
            return v
    next = __next__

which I'd then use like

@thinged
def fetch_one(self, n):
    data = json.load(urlopen(url_template % n))
    if data is None:
        raise StopThisThing()
    for row in data:
        if row_is_weird(row):
            raise StopThisThing()
        yield prepare(row)

def work(self):
    n = 1
    while True:
        one = self.fetch_one(n)
        consume(one)
        if one.finished:
            break
        n += 1

so what is this Thing I have created?

share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't a try/except around one = self.fetch_one(n) achieve the same result? –  Rik Poggi Mar 10 '12 at 22:25
    
@RikPoggi I don't think so: the termination can happen after fetch_one has already yielded useful data. –  Chipaca Mar 10 '12 at 22:27
    
edited to make the example clearer WRT @RikPoggi's point –  Chipaca Mar 10 '12 at 22:33
    
I see.. that's a complete different scenario. But I still don't like the coupling of the decorator and decorated function (one can't live wothout the other). –  Rik Poggi Mar 10 '12 at 22:59
    
In your code, it doesn't seem like you actually care why the data is finished. So why doesn't fetch_one simply raise StopIteration for any of the termination conditions? –  alexis Mar 11 '12 at 20:17
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that you can avoid that by yielding something special.

I had to build my own runnable example, to show what I mean:

def fetch_one(n):
    lst = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]][n]
    for x in lst:
        if x == 6:
            yield 'StopAll'
            return
        yield x

def work():
    n = 0
    in_progress = True
    while in_progress:
        numbers_iterator = fetch_one(n)
        for x in numbers_iterator:
            if x == 'StopAll':
                in_progress = False
                break
            print('x =', x)
        n += 1

work()

Output:

x = 1
x = 2
x = 3
x = 4
x = 5

I like this more than self.finished or a decorator like the one you built, but I think that something better could still be found. (Maybe this answer could help you with that).

Update: A much simplier solution might be to transform fetch_one into a class that carries its own finised flag.

A decorator approach to this solution might be:

class stopper(object):
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
        self.finished = False

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        for x in self.func(*args, **kwargs):
            if x == 6:
                self.finished = True
                raise StopIteration
            yield x
        else:
            self.finished = True

Basically you don't care anymore how fetch_one works, only if what yields is ok or not.

Usage example:

@stopper
def fetch_one(n):
    lst = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]][n]
    #lst = [[1,2,3], [], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]][n]   # uncomment to test for/else
    for x in lst:
        yield x

def work():
    n = 0
    while not fetch_one.finished:
        for x in fetch_one(n):
            print('x =', x)
        n += 1
share|improve this answer
    
This would certainly work, but it feels like I'm doing the same thing I'm hating this API for: in-band there-is-no-more-stuff information. On the other hand I'm the only consumer of this particular one, so ... –  Chipaca Mar 10 '12 at 23:52
    
@Chipaca: Well yes, you're in a way bound to the design you're trying to use and building on top of it will be the simplest solution. What kind of API would you like to have? A different design could use threading, but I don't know if it'll be worth it at the end. –  Rik Poggi Mar 11 '12 at 7:12
    
not sure how threads would help; the conflicting goals here are, in my mind at least, wanting to be able to easily test the individual fetcher (the thing that hits a single page) without having to go through the outer loop, while also allowing the inner loop to signal all the way up. So I'm probably missing something about your suggestion to use threads. –  Chipaca Mar 11 '12 at 17:32
    
@Chipaca: I was just thinking out loud that threading events and queues are a simple implementation of signaling between two things. Anyway, I give it a little more thought and I've updated my answer with a different approach. To me seems more simple, but maybe it's subjective. –  Rik Poggi Mar 12 '12 at 11:20
    
@Chipaca: It would be nice to know why I got unupvoted. –  Rik Poggi Mar 13 '12 at 21:35
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There is a much cleaner way to handle your situation: You have a datasource consisting of paged data, but the termination condition can be detected by examining individual lines. So I would use an iterator that fetches the data line by line, and stops when it should. No special values (in or out of band), no two-way communication.

Edit: I just discovered that you don't, in fact, care about page boundaries. In that case you should simply use this:

def linegetter(url_template):
    """
    Return the data line by line. Stop when end of input is detected.
    """
    n=0
    while True:
        n += 1
        data = json.load(urlopen(url_template % n))
        if data is None:
            return
        for row in data:
            if row_is_weird(row):
                return
            yield row

It returns the data row by row and you can prepare and consume it any way you want. Done!

That should be the entire answer, it seems. But suppose you need to process the data by page (as your code now does). Just group the first iterator's output into sub-iterators for each page. The code is more complicated because I pasted in a fully generic solution; but using it is really simple.

def linegetter(source, terminate=lambda x: False):
    """
    Return the data line by line, in a tuple with the page number.
    Stop when end of input is detected.
    """
    for n, data in enumerate(source):
        if data is None:
            return
        for row in data:
            if terminate(row):
                return
            yield (n, row)

def _giverow(source):
    "Yield page contents line by line, discarding page number"
    for page, row in source:
        yield row

def pagegetter(source):
    """Return an iterator for each page of incoming data.
    """
    import itertools
    for it in itertools.groupby(source, lambda x : x[0]):
        yield _giverow(it[1])

Demo: Each "row" is a digit, each page is a sublist. We stop when we see "b". Your main loop now has no termination checks:

incoming = iter([[1,2,3], [4,5,6, "b", 7], [7,8,9]])
def row_is_weird(r): 
    return r == "b"

for page in pagegetter(linegetter(incoming, row_is_weird)):
    print list(page)

As you can see, the code is fully generic. You can use it with an iterator that fetches json pages, like this:

from itertools import imap, count
jsonsource = imap(lambda n: json.load(urlopen(url_template % n)), count(1))
for page in pagegetter(linegetter(jsonsource, row_is_weird)):
    consume(page)
share|improve this answer
    
Do you call that cleaner? –  Rik Poggi Mar 12 '12 at 11:21
    
You don't think? The interface is a generic iterator with no up-down communication, it just stops when it stops. I suspect there's a nicer way to use groupby, maybe someone can spot it. (You could simplify by embedding the set-up in the pagegetter code, but this is fully general so I prefer it). –  alexis Mar 12 '12 at 11:31
    
Edit: Since he doesn't actually need to break it up into pages, this becomes even simpler. –  alexis Mar 12 '12 at 11:49
    
the reason for splitting the two loops is to be able to test the inner loop, which is typically the bit that varies the most between subclasses and has the most results parsing and validation, separately from the outer loop, which has deduplication and pagination logic (and is typically a lot more reusable, and nontrivial enough that I don't want it n-uplicated). –  Chipaca Mar 12 '12 at 15:11
    
Good, in that case I think you'll be interested in the full version of the above solution. Please take a look. You can use the linegetter by itself (just throw out the page indexes) or pass it to the pagegetter. –  alexis Mar 12 '12 at 15:15
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The name for you've invented is "poor man's version of an iterator". Your work function is spending effort reimplementing what python already provides in a for loop. You've got a sequence of values which could stop at any time, that's exactly why python's iterators provide. We'd be better off to move some of that logic into a separate function. Something like this:

def fetch_all(self):
    for n in itertools.count():
        data = json.load(urlopen(url_template % n))
        if data is None:
            return

        for row in data:
             if row_is_wierd(row):
                  return

        yield itertools.imap(prepare, data)

Alternatively, you could use exceptions

def fetch_all(self):
    for n in itertools.count():
        data = json.load(urlopen(url_template % n)
        if data is None:
             return

        try:
             yield map(prepare, data)
        except WierdRowError:
             return

Actually, I question the logic behind treating wierd rows this way. What makes a row wierd? Why are we stopping there? Is it really some sort of error that the row is wierd?

In any case your work function becomes

def work():
    for item in fetch_all():
        consume(item)

EDIT

With additional information I'd do something like

def fetch_rows():
    for n in itertools.count():
        data = json.load(urlopen(url_template % n))
        for row in data:

            if row_is_wierd(row):
                return
            yield row

This function produces the sequence of rows

def work():
    for row in fetch_all_rows():
         consume(row)

This function actually handles the rows.

Some or all of these could be replaced by iterator objects from itertools.

share|improve this answer
    
your fetch_all function is an iterator that produces iterators, which I now have to unroll (so I still have to do "extra work"). And yes, one of the ways this API signals that there are no more pages is by having an item be a database error. –  Chipaca Mar 11 '12 at 0:09
    
if I ignore that item (still have to filter it out, mind), the next page will be mimetype text/html and consist of a <b>, three PHP database errors, and a </b>. None was a bit of fiction to try to forget. –  Chipaca Mar 11 '12 at 0:16
    
@Chipaca, yes you have to unroll, but you can use a simple for loop (see edit) rather then the more complex code you wrote to do it. But the function could also be trivially adapted to flatten the iterator itself if that made sense for your data (I have no idea what it is) –  Winston Ewert Mar 11 '12 at 0:35
    
As far as I'm concerned that's just bad API design to have end of records be indicated by a database error. But I assume you are stuck with it. In pondering the best way to handle this, I wonder: do you care about page boundaries, or are you really just interested in the concatenation of the rows across all the pages –  Winston Ewert Mar 11 '12 at 0:39
    
Agreed re bad API design (or implementation; this doesn't feel designed to error out the way it does); government website from a developing country (so I'm surprised it even has an API), and the contractor seems to have left shortly after hooking this thing up. I don't care about page boundaries at all (in fact, they change -- they might change while I'm walking the pages, in fact, with new items added at the start, so I have to be ready to filter dupes). –  Chipaca Mar 11 '12 at 0:48
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I initially gave an incorrect answer; here's a better one.

You have several sequences (JSON files) that can either end normally or abruptly (if row_is_weird). If a sequence ends normally, next sequence has to be taken. This sequence of sequences ends when the you get None instead of a JSON file.</sanity-check>

You use an instance variable to signal both abrupt and normal ending. This helps your code break deeply nested loops, but it also introduces unwanted non-local state.

The easiest way to remove shared state is to pass it as a part of the result or parameters. Let's pass each row's 'weirdness' along with it. Actually, if a row is weird, we don't need to pass the row value, we just pass a value saying 'from now on, results are invalid'. It helps stop iteration at the right place.

Essentially it looks like the accepted answer, but internally you can view it as an application of Maybe and List monads. The added benefit is that you can never mistake your end-of-sequence token for a sequence token.

# preparations and mockups

input = [ # imitates rows or parsed JSON
  ['apple', 'orange', 'peach'], # entirely good rows
  ['meat', 'fowl', 'ROTTEN', 'unicorn'], # some good rows, then a bad one
  ['unicorn2', 'unicorn3'], # good rows we should never see
  None, # sentinel imitating 'no data' from JSON parser
]

def prepare(x): 
  print "%s is prepared" % x
  return 'prepared %s' %x

consume = lambda x: "%s is consumed" % x

row_is_weird = lambda x: x is 'ROTTEN'

# the solution

def maybe_prepare(row):
  if row_is_weird(row):
    return (False, None) # Nothing
  else:
    return (True, prepare(row)) # Just prepare(row)

def fetch_one(n):
  data = input[n-1] # instead of json.load(template % n)
  if data is None:
    return iter([(False, None)])
  else:
    return (maybe_prepare(row) for row in data)

# chain_all iterates over all items of all sequences in seqs 
chain_all = lambda seqs: (item for seq in seqs for item in seq)

from itertools import count
def work():
  for is_ok, prepared_row in chain_all(fetch_one(n) for n in count(1)):
    if not is_ok:
      break
    print consume(prepared_row)

This code is still simple to test, but testing of fetch_one() is slightly more tricky: you have to only iterate over values before the first (False, None). This is easily done with itertools.takewhile().

Function maybe_prepare() could be a one-liner, but I left it multiline for readability.

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