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Where exactly is the limit to adopt VM so it can suite better a particular View? Example:

There should be a command in UI (ex button) that should allow adding new item. Additional requirement can be that new item should be selected, ensured that its visible on control (lets say TreeView control), and to begin edit on the newly added item (in order to change predefined value that was set in VM). Lets assume that control doesn't have automatic mechanism to achieve this, so we need to do it manually. So the execution flow looks like this:

  1. invoke add command on VM - done is View's xaml.
  2. set SelectedItem to new item (usually we bind control's SelectedItem property to VM's CurrentItem property, and then just assign new item to CurrentItem.
  3. ensure that new item is visible on control - this must be done in View's code behind.
  4. Start editing - this must be done in View's code behind.

Now, since everywhere on net there are articles on using messages for almost everything, a question:

What do I break if I do it in the simple old fashion way? I use Click event instead of Command binding on adding new item, and in the method I do this:

// in View's Click event handler
ViewModel.AddCommand.Execute(null);
EnsureVisibleSelectedItem();
BeginEdit();

.. clean and clear! And what do I gain if I do it using messages:

// in ViewModel's AddCommand
AddNewItem();
SetCurrentItem();
SendMessageToEnsureVisibleSelectedItem();
SendMessageToBeginEditSelectedItem();

... where View has registered to receive these two messages.

Any light on this is greatly appreciated. To my opinion, UI can change, and VM should be able to adopt new UI without making changes to itself, so I dont quite understand current MVVM policy that is preached on internet.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say "make it simple".

What's really important in MVVM is:

  • what doesn't depend on the view should go in the ViewModel (your ViewModel must not be aware of the view in any way - not just by object reference)
  • everything else in the View and its code-behind.

Yes, in its code-behind. There's nothing wrong in writing code-behind if it is code that is related to the view, not logic. For instance, drag & drop management should be written in the code-behind.

To answer your question, you do not break anything in writing:

// in View's Click event handler
ViewModel.AddCommand.Execute(null);
EnsureVisibleSelectedItem();
BeginEdit();

Everything that is not related to the view is in the ViewModel, everything else in the View/code-behind. That's just fine.

No if I look at your second example:

// in ViewModel's AddCommand
AddNewItem();
SetCurrentItem();
SendMessageToEnsureVisibleSelectedItem();
SendMessageToBeginEditSelectedItem();

AddNewItem is OK (not related to the view), SetCurrentItem is OK (not related to the view), but what about SendMessageToEnsureVisibleSelectedItem and SendMessageToBeginEditSelectedItem? EnsureVisible is typically useful for a treeview, but what if your view wasn't built with a treeview? What if the control would automatically make the new selected item visible? Of course you could ignore the message, but you would have written some useless code in ViewModel because you thought your view would need it for UI display.

You have typically written here some code in the ViewModel that is aware of how the View should be working. Yes, you have reduced the number of lines in the code-behind, but you definitely have broken the pattern.

Your "old fashion way" is actually a good way for your needs. Your ViewModel is not aware of the view, that's what's important.

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+1 for: "Yes, in its code-behind. There's nothing wrong in writing code-behind if it is code that is related to the view" –  Uri Mar 11 '12 at 15:25
    
Thanks for the comment, my thoughts also. It seems though that new "helpers" are going in some other direction. If you look at the event2command, for example, does it not make VM dependent on UI? I mean, there could be an event with particular argument in silverlight that doesn't exist in Windows Phone API. In this way we make our VM a particular platform dependent. –  Goran Mar 12 '12 at 15:51
    
@Goran EventToCommand is used in the XAML (not in the VM) to "convert" an event to a command. Your ViewModel then exposes a "standard" ICommand property that is binded (thanks to EventToCommand) to any event in XAML. The VM is not aware of the UI actually. But I don't really like it honestly. It often over-complicates things. I prefer a normal event handler, and this.MyViewModel.MyCommand.Execute(...) in code-behind. Simple, straightforward, and doesn't adds pointless complexity in the UI code (i.e. the XAML code that describes the UI). –  ken2k Mar 12 '12 at 16:09
    
@ken2k Yes, but when eventToCommand "converts" an event to a command, it passes information (argument, if there is one, and usually there is) to a VM. This makes VM dependant on UI, since it must know what Type of argument can it accept. The code-behind mehtod that you are mentioning I also use, and my command will accept a custom type of argument that is defined by VM, and UI needs to convert its argument to VM argument. That way there is no dependency. SInce this is working good, why the need for eventToCommand, unless to reduce the ammount of code-behind, and introduce new dependency –  Goran Mar 12 '12 at 16:45

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