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If I have a method that is called many times, such as:

public int CalledManyTimes(int a, int b)
{
     MyObject myObject = new myObject();
     int c = a + b + myObject.GetSomeValue();

     return c;
}

Is there a performance boost by putting MyObject myObject; outside of the method, so it's only declared once, or will the compiler do this automatically?

How exactly are structs passed around?

I'm passing in a Point struct to a method (Point contains only int x, int y), and that method is altering the value and returning a new Point(newX, newY); Is it better to alter the Point that was passed into the method and return that? Or can I create a Point point; outside the method as proposed in my first question and use that?

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2  
have you measured and determined you actually have a performance problem? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 11 '12 at 0:11
1  
Have you profiled your code? Do you really need these micro optimizations? –  L.B Mar 11 '12 at 0:12
    
I don't have any performance issues as such, I just wrote a method that is called repeatedly in a loop for the duration of the program and wondered if declaring many variables as in the first example was a bad practice. –  SLC Mar 11 '12 at 0:12
1  
You said point was a struct, so usually you'll want it to be immutable. –  Jason Down Mar 11 '12 at 0:14
    
I don't know the answer, but why rely on the compiler instead of writing the best code in the first place? myObject doesn't seem to change during the loop - so create it once outside the method and that's it. Also, if you can pass ref Point and modify it, then you won't need the new Point overhead. Even if it's 2-3 cycles, in real-time applications this could sum up to.. a lot. –  AVIDeveloper Mar 11 '12 at 0:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

myObject appears to have no useful state; so: make that a static method - problem solved; no allocation, no virtual call:

public int CalledManyTimes(int a, int b)
{
     int c = a + b + MyObject.GetSomeValue(); // static method

     return c;
}

For anything else: profile.

Looking at your specific questions:

Is there a performance boost by putting MyObject myObject; outside of the method, so it's only declared once, or will the compiler do this automatically?

Initializing it zero times is even faster. However, if there is some state that isn't obvious in the question, then yes, I would expect it to be more efficient to reuse a single instance - however, that changes the semantic (in the original the state is not shared between iterations).

How exactly are structs passed around?

By default, they are copied on the stack as soon as you so much as glance in their direction. You can use ref to avoid the copy, which may be useful if the struct is massively overweight, or need to be updated (ideally with reassignment, rather than mutability).

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3  
small note: there's no real benefit removing the c - the compiler can do that perfectly well itself in an optimized build; but with the c in place it is often easier to debug. –  Marc Gravell Mar 11 '12 at 0:22
    
So garbage collection won't re-use an object, it'll always delete it? I guess if my method is being called 50 times per second then I should try to move as many object declarations outside the method as possible then (and make them static if required). As for structs, I guess the same rule applies. The case of structs, the method is basically, here's an x coordinate, give me a new x co-ordinate back. I can't ref it as I will want to compare the result, so it was return new myStruct(x) vs passedInStruct.X = x, return passedInStruct; –  SLC Mar 11 '12 at 0:40
    
@SLC, 50 times a second? In this case you can write almost any code without measurable impact. Try and measure - Stopwatch is enough for most cases. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 11 '12 at 2:30
    
@SLC no, an object is never automatically reused; and indeed, 50 times a second is nothing –  Marc Gravell Mar 11 '12 at 8:14
    
Oh, cool! Thanks :) –  SLC Mar 11 '12 at 11:43

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