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The documentation for the new Vista API says that the PowerEnumerate function can be used to Enumerate power schemes, scheme settings, and a wealth of information, The last two parameters are Buffer and BufferSize, what is unclear is what structures or data layout/format is used for the data that is returned in the buffer by the API?

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Man, +1 because this has to be the ugliest API documentation I've ever seen in MSDN. I can't for the life of me find out how to use that buffer, except maybe examine it in a watch and try to if it's a string or a guid or something. –  Assaf Lavie Jun 8 '09 at 14:41

1 Answer 1

The output buffer is a GUID. You can use this guid to make additional calls to the Power* functions (i.e. recursively walk the tree, query setting names and values, etc).

For example the following code enumerates some setting names from the disk power settings in the current power scheme:

GUID *scheme;

if(ERROR_SUCCESS == PowerGetActiveScheme(NULL, &scheme))
{
    GUID buffer;
    DWORD bufferSize = sizeof(buffer);

    for(int index = 0; ; index++)
    {
        if(ERROR_SUCCESS == PowerEnumerate(
                                NULL,
                                scheme, 
                                &GUID_DISK_SUBGROUP, 
                                ACCESS_INDIVIDUAL_SETTING, 
                                index, 
                                (UCHAR*)&buffer, 
                                &bufferSize))
        {
            UCHAR displayBuffer[1024];
            DWORD displayBufferSize = sizeof(displayBuffer);

            if(ERROR_SUCCESS == PowerReadFriendlyName(
                                    NULL, 
                                    scheme, 
                                    &GUID_DISK_SUBGROUP, 
                                    &buffer, 
                                    displayBuffer, 
                                    &displayBufferSize))
            {
                wprintf(L"%s\n", (wchar_t*)displayBuffer);
            }
        }
    }
}

As you can see the steps are:

  1. get the current power scheme
  2. enumerate the disk settings in the current scheme
  3. print the friendly name of each enumerated setting

On my machine the output:

Turn off hard disk after
Hard disk burst ignore time

Hopefully this helps get you pointed in the right direction.

This is not production quality code that favors small size and optimistic buffer sizes over robustness.

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