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I have an older database Oracle RDB. I used ODBC on Windows with .net, but I'm not sure how to proceed on RoR on a Mac OS X server. I don't know how I do it on Windows either with RoR.

I was hoping for general direction.

EDIT: I searched for activerecord and rdb but have nto found it yet. I saw references to rdb$database and so on in code for firebird but that's it.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How old? because there are some resources for Rails and Oracle, like this

http://www.oracle.com/technology/pub/articles/haefel-oracle-ruby.html

or maybe you could try with JRuby and JDBC, it's super easy, you have to copy the oracle jdbc jar file in the jruby/lib folder, and then in the rails project setup your database (config/database.yml) like this

production:
  adapter: jdbc
  driver: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
  url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@you_server_address:1521:instanceName
  username: user
  password: pass
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Thank you. I may be forced to use jRuby then (not that that's a bad thing), since there is a JDBC driver or Oracle RDB. If I do this do I still get all the "regular" ActiveRecord and RoR stuff? –  johnny Jun 8 '09 at 15:02
    
absolutely! JRuby is an implementation of the Ruby language, so rails runs fine without any modification! –  Luke Jun 8 '09 at 22:19

You need to use the Oracle Rdb specific JDBC driver. Go to http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/rdb/index-090638.html

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This question shows how to configure RoR with Oracle on linux and mac:

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Oracle RDB is different from Oracle RDBMS

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yes. it is different. RDB was Digital's (I think) long ago, now owned by Oracle. –  johnny Oct 12 '09 at 16:49

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