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it may looks like a dummy question for you but I have difficulties solving this:

We have an abstract class Animal and Cat and Dog that extends it. In Animal we have a method produceSound(); that is abstract. As you can probably guess for Cat it should return "Mao" and for Dog - "Bao" or something like that. This is OK but now we must write a static method in the Animal class that returns Cat or Dog objects depending on their sound. For example: identifyAnimal("Mao") should return Cat.

Question: How to implement the identifyAnimal(String sound) method?

Here is some simple example of the hierarchy:

Animal class

public abstract class Animal {

    protected abstract String produceSound();

    protected static void identifyAnimal(String animalSound) {
        // TODO 
    }
}

Cat class

public class Cat extends Animal{

    @Override
    protected String produceSound() {
        return "Mao";
    }
}  

Dog class

public class Dog extends Animal{

    @Override
    protected String produceSound() {
        return "Bao";
    }
}  

Test class

public class AnimalTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Animal.identifyAnimal("Bao");
    }
}  

In the AnimalTest class when calling the Animal.identifyAnimal("Bao"); we should get a Dog.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want dog.identifyAnimal("Mao") to return... some instance of Cat or the word Cat? Perhaps dog shouldnt know anything about cat. But if it only knows about "Bao", then you're really asking, boolean dog.isYourSound("Bao"); Static methods aren't on any instance. –  david van brink Mar 11 '12 at 2:04
    
Just wondering, in which country does the cat say Mao and the dog Bao? –  rid Mar 11 '12 at 2:04
    
I have just edited the question. –  nyxz Mar 11 '12 at 2:04
1  
@Radu in the country south from yours. –  nyxz Mar 11 '12 at 2:05
1  
@nnnnnn this is happening a lot isn't it ;) –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 11 '12 at 2:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
private static Class[] animalTypes = [Dog.class, Cat.class];

public static String identifyAnimal(String animalSound)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < animalTypes.length; i++) {
        Animal a = animalTypes[i].newInstance();
        String s = a.produceSound();

        if (animalSound.equals(s))
            return animalTypes[i].getName();
    }

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
May be combining yours with the @AdamReed's solution is the golden middle –  nyxz Mar 11 '12 at 2:31

So here a (terrible) way to do this. I actually twitched a little. I dont know what language you are using, so Im going with c++(sorry current mode) though you could replace maps with Dictionarys if we are in C#, whatever. This is a bad way to go about things, but should work(conceptually, anyway)

Again...Terrible...

public abstract class Animal {

    protected abstract String produceSound();

    protected static map<string, string> SoundList;
    protected static bool registerSound(string sound, string type)
    {
          return (SoundList.insert( pair<string, string>(sound, type)))->second;//true if worked false if already there

    }

    protected static string identifyAnimal(string animalSound) 
    {
          map<string,string>::iterator result = SoundList.find(sound);
          if(result != SoundList.end())
               return result->second;
          else
               return "What The Hell Is This!?";
    }
}
Cat class

public class Cat extends Animal
   {
         Cat()
         {
               Animal::registerSound("Mao","Cat");
         }

    @Override
    protected String produceSound() {
        return "Mao";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just read the Java Tag...would probably go with Manishs solution then –  Adam Reed Mar 11 '12 at 2:27
    
Or a combo, registering Classes instead of strings. Though this still has the problem of worthless overhead(after first registry/class) –  Adam Reed Mar 11 '12 at 2:30
abstract class Animal { 
    static Map<String,String> map = new HashMap<String,String>();
    public Animal(String value) { map.put(produceSound(), value); }
    protected abstract String produceSound(); 
    protected static void identifyAnimal(String animalSound) {
        System.out.println(map.get(animalSound));
    }
}

class Cat extends Animal {
    @Override 
    protected String produceSound() { return "Mao"; } 
    Cat(){ super("CAT"); }
}   

class Dog extends Animal { 
    @Override 
    protected String produceSound() { return "Bao"; } 
    Dog(){ super("DOG"); }
}   

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Dog();        
        new Cat();
        Animal.identifyAnimal("Bao"); 
    }    
}
share|improve this answer

Do a switch with the predefined sounds that you have and let each sound return a string with the name of the animal. For example "Mao" returns a string "Cat" and so on. One more thing let ur identifyAnimal method returna string instead of void.

share|improve this answer
    
Your method should have a string parameter off course and shouldn't be static I guess –  Ali Issa Mar 11 '12 at 2:09

You could use reflection to get a list of all types that extend Animal, loop through them using Activator to create instances of each type running produceSound on each until you find the return value that matches animalSound, returning that instance. Slow, but effective if you want to avoid your Animal class being aware of what extends it.

share|improve this answer
    
Whoops didn't see the Java tag, I was assuming C# –  Chris Ray Mar 11 '12 at 2:57

What is the nature of the problem you are trying to solve? There is no 'right' way that is independent of the problem.

What does the consuming application need from the class Animal? What does your application need to do with the classes that it consumes? Nothing can be assumed unless these presumptions are clear.

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