Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
  1. Why aren't final variables default initialized? Shouldn't the default constructor initialize them to default values if you are happy with the constant be the default value.

  2. Why must you initialized them in the constructor at all? Why can you can't you just initialize them before using them like other variables?

ex.

public class Untitled {

public final int zero;

     public static void main(String[] args)
     {
          final int a; // this works
          a = 4; // this works, but using a field doesn't
          new Untitled();
     }
}

Untitled.java:2: variable a might not have been initialized
  1. Why must you initialize static final variables when they are declared? Why can't you just initialize them before using them in any other method?

ex.

public class Untitled
{

      public final static int zero;

      public static void main(String[] args)
      {
           zero = 0;
      }
}

Untitled.java:8: cannot assign a value to final variable zero

I'm asking these question because I'm trying to find a logical/conceptual reason why this won't work, why it isn't allowed. Not just because it isn't.

share|improve this question
    
Keep in mind that main() is not a constructor. Obviously you can't assign to a final variable in a method that's not a constructor. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 11 '12 at 2:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The idea behind a final variable is that it is set once and only once.

For instance final variables, that means they can only be set during initialization, whether at declaration, in a constructor, or an instance initialization block. For the variable to be set anywhere else, that would have to take place in a non-constructor method, which could be called multiple times - that's why this is off limits.

Similarly for static final variables, they can only be set at declaration or in a static initialization block. Anywhere else would, again, have to be in a method which could be called more that once:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
     zero = 0;
     main(null);
}

As for your first question, I'm assuming it's an error not to explicitly set a final variable in order to avoid mistakes by the programmer.

share|improve this answer
    
That's actually makes a lot of sense. I didn't consider that, I will accept this answer :-) –  rubixibuc Mar 11 '12 at 2:31
    
If you have multiple constructors, they each can set the value of a final instance field. Inside a single constructor or init block, you can have multiple assignments (e.g., if ( something ) { x = 1 ; } else { x = 2 ; } So the compiler does not treat final local variables differently than static or instance fields of a class. –  emory Mar 11 '12 at 2:53
    
@emory - You're right. Just to be clear, in all cases there can be exactly one assignment (or throw) per code path. What the OP was wondering in the comments was why local final variables can go unassigned, unlike final fields. But my edit doesn't really answer this - I'll remove it. –  Paul Bellora Mar 11 '12 at 3:13

The Java Language Specification section 8.3.1.2 spells out the rules for final member variables:

A field can be declared final (§4.12.4). Both class and instance variables (static and non-static fields) may be declared final.

It is a compile-time error if a blank final (§4.12.4) class variable is not definitely assigned (§16.8) by a static initializer (§8.7) of the class in which it is declared.

A blank final instance variable must be definitely assigned (§16.9) at the end of every constructor (§8.8) of the class in which it is declared; otherwise a compile-time error occurs.

The JLS doesn't give reasons why the rules are they way they are. However, it might have come from experience in writing Java code, and the above rules are a way to avoid some common coding errors.

share|improve this answer
    
I know those rules, I don't understand why they did that. I'm trying to understand how it handles it at the mechanical level. –  rubixibuc Mar 11 '12 at 2:29

The concept of being final means that the variable value cannot change. If you could do as in your second example, then this variable would have been like any other one (i.e. not final)

I don't ave a good rational regarding your first question.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue I'm having with Java is that if I declared it as a local variable as I did above, it would work. I don't get the difference between using a final field or a final local variable –  rubixibuc Mar 11 '12 at 2:27

Because, when looking at your code, the Java compiler has no idea whether a given statement will be executed before an other statement. The only exceptions to this rule are code in constructors and implicit constructors, and that's why they're the only place that final fields can be assigned to.

share|improve this answer
    
What is an implicit constructor? I am not familiar with that term. Are you referring to an init block as in class X { int x ; { x = 10 ; } }? –  emory Mar 11 '12 at 2:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.