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Okay, so I've noticed, going through some programs other people have written (for education of myself). And I have noticed, why do people sometimes not have an output for their exceptions? Like they'll just do a

public class noException {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
      System.out.println("Hello World!");
    } catch(Exception e) {

    }
  }
}

Wouldn't you want to see what exception has been caught? Or does it come down to just personal preference with programmers?

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closed as not constructive by John Woo, mu is too short, Mike Samuel, tchrist, jmort253 Mar 11 '12 at 4:00

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
That’s the kind of thing that will get you fired. Or should. –  tchrist Mar 11 '12 at 3:57
    
So, imagine you're a novice programmer. You notice that some of the methods have checked exceptions. You keep adding little catch blocks, and you don't expect any of them to get caught. So, thinking cleverly, you shove it all in one big try{}catch(Exception e){} block. Woo, clever! Or, worse, let's say your program appears to work fine, but it keeps printing out an annoying stack trace on the console when it's done. Ug-lee!! So let's just wrap up that bad boy in a try/catch. Problem solved! They do it because it solves an immediate problem quickly, and they don't know it's gonna bite 'em. –  Brandon Yarbrough Mar 11 '12 at 4:04
    
this is a best practices question (that is language independent), and does not meet the grounds used for closing. though it could degenerate into an argument over why it should be better to modify the question, and allow for information to be given to a question on best practices –  gardian06 Mar 11 '12 at 4:05
    
@gardian06 My close vote was a migrate to Programmers. These days anything that can’t be answered with a line of code seems to get booted. –  tchrist Mar 11 '12 at 4:08
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, this is a bad practice mainly by two reasons. The first one is that by catching Exception you are catching any kind of them, whereas you should catch all possible exceptions individually, each one in its own catch (it is completely legal to do it for one try). By catching the generic you can offuscate another unexpected exceptions in your code and makes it much more difficult to debug.

The other reason is that you should do something once you have catched the exception, at least do some log, show an error message, rollback, etc. And if you definitely want to do nothing you should provide a comment between the catch brackets explaining the reason why you pass.

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"The first one is that by catching Exception you are catching any kind of them, whereas you should catch all possible exceptions individually, each one in its own cath (it is completely legal to do it for one try)." - That is misleading advice. For instance, in the OP's example, it is (IMO) fine to catch Throwable and print (or log) the exception's name and message ... then exit. Catch exceptions individually if you can deal with them individually. The real no-no is catching Exception when you can't deal with all of the possible subtypes, including unexpected unchecked exceptions. –  Stephen C Mar 11 '12 at 7:28
1  
@Stephen I agree, although often enough the error handling is identical for several different exceptions. That's where the new Java7 multiple catch comes in quite handy. –  Voo Mar 11 '12 at 13:24
    
@Voo Yes, this is a very useful new feature –  Caumons Mar 11 '12 at 13:36
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Programmers who do that are lazy, or ignorant ... or both.

It is BAD PRACTICE.

Yes, you (as the developer) should want to see what the exception was. And a user, I'd want to know if the program has crashed ... when it does.


I guess the only excuse for doing something like that is if you are writing the code purely for self-educational purposes, and you can guarantee to throw it away before anyone else sees it.

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"if you are writing the code purely for self-educational purposes, and you can guarantee to throw it away before anyone else sees it." I find it ironic that this is posted on StackOverflow - the site where such code is most likely to end up shown to others. In other words, I don't think this premise/promise/excuse is likely to be upheld; I've seen "just a scratchpad test code, honest" become the core of a production system too many times. –  Piskvor Mar 14 '12 at 8:44
    
@Piskvor - "I don't think this premise/promise/excuse is likely to be upheld". Neither do I. However, when the promise is kept, this is (IMO) a valid excuse. –  Stephen C Mar 14 '12 at 9:18
    
Sure, I'm not denying that. –  Piskvor Mar 14 '12 at 10:19
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Probably becasue they are lazy, or don't know what to do when exceptions occur. In worst case, they should atleast log it.

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No, it’s not because they are lazy: it’s because they are stupid. –  tchrist Mar 11 '12 at 4:00
    
Yeah, you are right. –  Samarth Bhargava Mar 11 '12 at 4:02
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