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I was reading through How can I write a power function myself? and the answer given by dan04 caught my attention mainly because I am not sure about the answer given by fortran, but I took that and implemented this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
float pow(float base, float ex){
    // power of 0
    if (ex == 0){
        return 1;
    // negative exponenet
    }else if( ex < 0){
        return 1 / pow(base, -ex);
    // even exponenet
    }else if ((int)ex % 2 == 0){
        float half_pow = pow(base, ex/2);
        return half_pow * half_pow;
    //integer exponenet
    }else{
        return base * pow(base, ex - 1);
    }
}
int main(){
    for (int ii = 0; ii< 10; ii++){\
        cout << "pow(" << ii << ".5) = " << pow(ii, .5) << endl;
        cout << "pow(" << ii << ",2) = " << pow(ii,  2) << endl;
        cout << "pow(" << ii << ",3) = " << pow(ii,  3) << endl;
    }
}

though I am not sure if I translated this right because all of the calls giving .5 as the exponent return 0. In the answer it states that it might need a log2(x) based on a^b = 2^(b * log2(a)), but I am unsure about putting that in as I am unsure where to put it, or if I am even thinking about this right.

NOTE: I know that this might be defined in a math library, but I don't need all the added expense of an entire math library for a few functions.

EDIT: does anyone know a floating-point implementation for fractional exponents? (I have seen a double implementation, but that was using a trick with registers, and I need floating-point, and adding a library just to do a trick I would be better off just including the math library)

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3  
Or the added expense of a FPU? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 11 '12 at 4:51
2  
you're missing the fractional exponent (the code there is for an even exponent) - looking at the original link, i think you are copying from something that only supports integer exponents (hence tests for fractional will fail). –  andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 4:51
12  
I assure you that this is more expensive than math.h's pow. –  Pubby Mar 11 '12 at 4:52
    
@andrewcooke dang it. could you help me out by showing the needed changes –  gardian06 Mar 11 '12 at 4:52
1  
@BrettHale it's log2(n) isn't it? so for pow(base, 1000000) it's a depth of about 20. –  andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 5:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+25

Below are links to real implementations of powf.

I expect simpler solutions would lack accuracy in the result or not handle InF and NaN parameters.

http://opensource.apple.com/source/Libm/Libm-2026/Source/Intel/expf_logf_powf.c

http://opensource.apple.com/source/Libm/Libm-315/Source/ARM/powf.c

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+1 I discovered it was non-trivial to implement pow. One problem, that Newton-Raphson for computing n'th root converges very slowly (not very fast) for high n and x. The implementation that this answer links to, alhought apparently only for float, avoids that. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 28 '12 at 18:50

I have looked at this paper here which describes how to approximate the exponential function for double precision. After a little research on Wikipedia about single precision floating point representation I have worked out the equivalent algorithms. They only implemented the exp function, so I found an inverse function for the log and then simply did

    POW(a, b) = EXP(LOG(a) * b).

compiling this gcc4.6.2 yields a pow function almost 4 times faster than the standard library's implementation (compiling with O2).

Note: the code for EXP is copied almost verbatim from the paper I read and the LOG function is copied from here.

Here is the relevant code:

    #define EXP_A 184
    #define EXP_C 16249 

    float EXP(float y)
    {
      union
      {
        float d;
        struct
        {
    #ifdef LITTLE_ENDIAN
          short j, i;
    #else
          short i, j;
    #endif
        } n;
      } eco;
      eco.n.i = EXP_A*(y) + (EXP_C);
      eco.n.j = 0;
      return eco.d;
    }

    float LOG(float y)
    {
      int * nTemp = (int*)&y;
      y = (*nTemp) >> 16;
      return (y - EXP_C) / EXP_A;
    }

    float POW(float b, float p)
    {
      return EXP(LOG(b) * p);
    }

There is still some optimization you can do here, or perhaps that is good enough. This is a rough approximation but if you would have been satisfied with the errors introduced using the double representation, I imagine this will be satisfactory.

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I think that you could try to solve it by using the Taylor's series, check this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_series

With the Taylor's series you can solve any difficult to solve calculation such as 3^3.8 by using the already known results such as 3^4. In this case you have 3^4 = 81 so

3^3.8 = 81 + 3.8*3( 3.8 - 4) +..+.. and so on depend on how big is your n you will get the closer solution of your problem.

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Taylor series comes to a question of curve fitting, and requires knowing an appropriate number of terms to use to generate an accurate value. to few and you can easily hit the constant increase/decrease, and to many, and your wasting processes. is there a reasonable suggestion on the k number of the summation? –  gardian06 Mar 25 '12 at 8:10
    
You could compare the result of the last calculation in the series with some standard number like 0.0000001 so this is a limit of accuracy. So you have to make it as iteration as a sum and check the calculation of each iteration if the final value of it is < than 0.000001 for example you will break the iteration. –  AlexTheo Mar 25 '12 at 14:18

I think the algorithm you're looking for could be 'nth root'. With an initial guess of 1 (for k == 0):

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


float pow(float base, float ex);

float nth_root(float A, int n) {
    const int K = 6;
    float x[K] = {1};
    for (int k = 0; k < K - 1; k++)
        x[k + 1] = (1.0 / n) * ((n - 1) * x[k] + A / pow(x[k], n - 1));
    return x[K-1];
}

float pow(float base, float ex){
    if (base == 0)
        return 0;
    // power of 0
    if (ex == 0){
        return 1;
    // negative exponenet
    }else if( ex < 0){
        return 1 / pow(base, -ex);
    // fractional exponent
    }else if (ex > 0 && ex < 1){
        return nth_root(base, 1/ex);
    }else if ((int)ex % 2 == 0){
        float half_pow = pow(base, ex/2);
        return half_pow * half_pow;
    //integer exponenet
    }else{
        return base * pow(base, ex - 1);
    }
}
int main_pow(int, char **){
    for (int ii = 0; ii< 10; ii++){\
        cout << "pow(" << ii << ", .5) = " << pow(ii, .5) << endl;
        cout << "pow(" << ii << ",  2) = " << pow(ii,  2) << endl;
        cout << "pow(" << ii << ",  3) = " << pow(ii,  3) << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

test:

pow(0, .5) = 0.03125
pow(0,  2) = 0
pow(0,  3) = 0
pow(1, .5) = 1
pow(1,  2) = 1
pow(1,  3) = 1
pow(2, .5) = 1.41421
pow(2,  2) = 4
pow(2,  3) = 8
pow(3, .5) = 1.73205
pow(3,  2) = 9
pow(3,  3) = 27
pow(4, .5) = 2
pow(4,  2) = 16
pow(4,  3) = 64
pow(5, .5) = 2.23607
pow(5,  2) = 25
pow(5,  3) = 125
pow(6, .5) = 2.44949
pow(6,  2) = 36
pow(6,  3) = 216
pow(7, .5) = 2.64575
pow(7,  2) = 49
pow(7,  3) = 343
pow(8, .5) = 2.82843
pow(8,  2) = 64
pow(8,  3) = 512
pow(9, .5) = 3
pow(9,  2) = 81
pow(9,  3) = 729
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sorry had other projects to work on. this crashes when given say a .3 –  gardian06 Mar 22 '12 at 1:46
    
I tried adding .3, seems to work (I'm using GCC 4.5). but see the edit for the base == 0... –  CapelliC Mar 22 '12 at 7:18
    
I tried adding 1/3 exponent, values are garbled, I'm going to test more... –  CapelliC Mar 22 '12 at 7:51
    
@chac: Did you literally try 1/3? Because that is 0 because of integer division. To make it float division, you need to use 1./3. instead (actually one of the dots is already sufficient). –  celtschk Mar 24 '12 at 20:43
    
@celtschk: I tried with float, but the approach it's fundamentally flawed, losing precision for the integer conversion performed by 1/ex at nth_root(base, 1/ex); –  CapelliC Mar 24 '12 at 21:11

I and my friend faced similar problem while we're on an OpenGL project and math.h didn't suffice in some cases. Our instructor also had the same problem and he told us to seperate power to integer and floating parts. For example, if you are to calculate x^11.5 you may calculate sqrt(x^115, 10) which may result more accurate result.

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this would require a larger exponentiation to start with. though it may simplify having to calculate floating point powers it would also increase the number of recursive, or loop calls made within the power function (considering that unless bit math is being done it needs some kind of loop) –  gardian06 Mar 25 '12 at 8:05

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