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The BigInteger constructor in Java:

public BigInteger(int bitLength,
                  int certainty,
                  Random rnd)

Constructs a randomly generated positive BigInteger that is probably prime, with the specified bitLength. It is recommended that the probablePrime method be used in preference to this constructor unless there is a compelling need to specify a certainty.

Parameters:

bitLength - bitLength of the returned BigInteger.
certainty - a measure of the uncertainty that the caller is willing to tolerate. The probability that the new BigInteger represents a prime number will exceed (1 - 1/2certainty). The execution time of this constructor is proportional to the value of this parameter.
rnd - source of random bits used to select candidates to be tested for primality. 

DOES this means Higher the value for certainty, more is the probability to get a prime number? In this case what value should be chosen for certainty to get a 512 bit prime number?

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2 Answers 2

DOES this means Higher the value for certainty, more is the probability to get a prime number?

Yes.

In this case what value should be chosen for certainty to get a 512 bit prime number?

The javadoc answers this:

certainty - a measure of the uncertainty that the caller is willing to tolerate. The probability that the new BigInteger represents a prime number will exceed (1 - 1/(2certainty)).

That larger you make certainty, the smaller this the probablility that the number is not prime. It is up to you to decide what probability of a non-prime is acceptable to you.

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Computers are pieces of machinery that can fail. Provided the probability you pick is smaller than the probability that your computer has failed then you will not be able to do better.

For cryptographic purposes, 128 or 256 would be sufficiently large. Any more than this would be overkill. Bear in mind that the actually probability of error is much smaller; the probability derives from the number of iterations of the Miller-Rabin test that are run internally. The (1 - 1/(2^certainty)) is a theoretical bound. The actual bound is better than that.

You should also use SecureRandom since there is insufficient entropy in plain Random to get a good distribution of large primes. Some problems have recently been identified with some RSA implementations because of weak RNG input into prime number generators.

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the only limitaion is that i have to use it in java 1.3. If that would have been any higher version of java then i would have definitely gone for SecureRandom –  Himanshu.MarJAVA Mar 22 '12 at 15:57

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