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I'm trying to store the leftmost byte of edx and followed by the contents of eax into a 5-byte spot in memory with the following line:

mov numh, [dl:eax]

and I get the error "invalid segment override".

What does this mean and how can I fix it?

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1 Answer 1

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First, "invalid segment override" refers to the way you expressed [dl:eax]. In this expression, 'dl' acts as something called a segment register. The problem is that dl is not a valid segment register. Segment registers are not what you want to use in this case.

I want to clarify what you are asking in your question:

  • numh references some 5-byte area of memory
  • edx contains, e.g., 0x12345678, and by "leftmost byte of edx", you want to store 0x12

If the above is true, you need to save edx (if you care about its contents), shift right by 24 bits to get 0x12 into dl, and then store it.

Here's some ASM off the top of my head:

push edx          ; save initial value
shr edx, 24       ; get the leftmost byte down to the 'dl' portion of edx
mov [numh], dl    ; write the byte to the memory referenced by numh
mov [numh+1], eax ; write eax
pop edx           ; restore original edx value

Note: I can't remember if "mov [numh+1]" is valid. But I hope this gets you moving in the right direction.

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"First, "invalid segment override" refers to the way you expressed [dl:eax]. In this expression, 'dl' acts as something called a segment register. The problem is that dl is not a valid segment register. Segment registers are not what you want to use in this case." can you elaborate on this? –  mavix Mar 11 '12 at 5:57
    
Segment registers are a bit beyond the scope of this discussion since they are not what you want to use in this case. Try the path I outlined above and if you are interested in how segment registers work (x86 esoterica in this day and age), read this article: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_memory_segmentation –  Multimedia Mike Mar 11 '12 at 6:05
    
The path you outlined should work; I was just under the impression that [dl:eax] would refer to the concatenated data of dl and eax. –  mavix Mar 11 '12 at 6:27
    
Oh goodness, no. :) That looks like the type of construct that would work in a much higher level language, but ASM keeps things extremely simple. You have to explicitly dictate every little step of the program to the computer. –  Multimedia Mike Mar 11 '12 at 6:29

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