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I have the following snippet of code that loops through the jQuery animate function endlessly. It works fine on Chrome, but fails after the first animate call on IE. My questions are:

  • How can I make this work in IE (9)?
  • How can I add a delay after the first loop? I want there to be a delay between consecutive pulses.

    #container {
    position : relative;
    width    : 500px;
    height   : 200px;
    overflow : hidden;
    opacity: 1;
    }
    

.

 #container > img {
    position : absolute;
    top      : 0;
    left     : 0;
    }

.

$(window).load(function(){
$(function () {
    var $image = $('#container').children('img');
    function animate_img() {
        if ($image.css('opacity') == '1') {
            $image.animate({opacity: '0.4'}, 2000, function () {
                animate_img();
            });
        } else {console.log('2');
            $image.animate({opacity: '1'}, 2000, function () {
                animate_img();
            });
        }
    }
    animate_img();
});

});

.

<div id="container">
  <img src="blah.jpg" width="500" height="375" />
</div>
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Remove the console.log() statement from the else branch and it should work in IE - IE doesn't like console.log() unless the console is actually open, whereas (most) other browsers either ignore it or log in a way you can see if you open the console later. (I don't have IE9, but that's all it took to fix it when I tested it in IE8.)

Also it doesn't make sense to have a document ready handler inside a $(window).load() handler, so you should remove one or the other.

As far as adding a delay between consecutive pulses, just use jQuery's .delay() function before calling .animate() in the else branch, like this:

$(function () {
    var $image = $('#container').children('img');
    function animate_img() {
        if ($image.css('opacity') == '1') {
            $image.animate({opacity: '0.4'}, 2000, function () {
                animate_img();
            });
        } else { // console.log removed from this spot
            $image.delay(500).animate({opacity: '1'}, 2000, function () {
                animate_img();
            });
        }
    }
    animate_img();
});

P.S. Given that the anonymous functions you've got for the .animate() complete callbacks don't do anything except call animate_img() you can remove the anonymous functions and just pass animate_img directly. So you can make the function much shorter if you wish:

$(function () {
  var $image = $('#container').children('img');
  function animate_img() {
    var fade = $image.css('opacity') == '1';
    $image.delay(fade?1:500).animate({opacity:fade?'0.4':'1'},2000,animate_img);
  }
  animate_img();
});
share|improve this answer

After a deleted discussion about if setTimeout() or setInterval() should be used, a different solution using setInterval()

$(function () {
 var $image = $('#container').children('img');
 function animate_img() {
  if ($image.css('opacity') == 1) {
   $image.animate({opacity: 0.4},{ queue:false, duration:2000});
  } else {
   $image.animate({opacity: 1},{ queue:false, duration:2000});
  }
 }
 setInterval(animate_img, 4000);
});

Notice that interval time should have a minimum of 4000ms, which the sum of the animation time (2000ms each) back and forth. If the interval is less than that, the animations won't be completed.

I insisted in the previous (deleted) discussion that the correct syntax for setInterval should be setInterval("animate_img()", 4000) ... my bad, because I missed that setInterval was within a function ... so the function animate_img should be called as a pointer rather than a string.

The advantage of this solution (I think) is less lines of code but also that we don't need to call the function animate_img() 3 times in the loop and from within itself.

This should work fine in Chrome as well as in IE.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the OP wanted a "delay between consecutive pulses", where I suspect a "pulse" is a fade-in and fade-out cycle such that the desired behaviour is fade-in/fade-out/delay/fade-in/fade-out/delay/etc. – nnnnnn Mar 12 '12 at 0:24

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