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I am developing a PHP application that deals with a large MySQL database and now I am starting to go over my memory limit (64mb) in PHP because of the database queries. I was wondering what the best way is to prevent (and if not, stop) memory exhaustion in PHP and MySQL?

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closed as not a real question by deceze, Interrobang, wallyk, Your Common Sense, Graviton Mar 15 '12 at 9:16

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That depends on what you're doing in your script and why you're going over the memory limit. Without knowing that, the only advise to give is: conserve memory better. –  deceze Mar 11 '12 at 8:16

6 Answers 6

Can you post examples of the queries you run on your database and how you then want to use that for your webpage?

It is very rare to need 64Mb of data from the mysql server to generate a page. Do you do the following to limit the data received:

  • Use LIMIT statements to extract only the first lines
  • Specify in SELECT the columns that you really need (instead of SELECT *)
  • Be as specific as possible in your WHERE clause
  • Use mysql_free_result to free up resources between two different SQL requests (in case you run several of them)?
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Instead of trying to rewrite the SQL queries, I'll just post a link to the PHP file that I am running into problems with: http://pastebin.com/JxCJnaGW. The first query returns 12,201 rows and the second query returns 2,179 rows. Please let me know if you need any more information. –  ub3rst4r Mar 11 '12 at 19:09

Is all the info that you get from the mysql server really needed to produce the web page? Move as much data processing (filtering, paging, aggregate counts) as you can to the database server.

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try to use paginations in your web pages. or if you are making calculations in your php scripts(cron jobs for example), try to load data chunk by chunk and make necessary calculations. also if your table rows are too big, you may think of dividing table fields into new tables with the same unique ids(userid for example).

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Limit would help. Instead of running a single query that returns 100,000 rows, run 4 queries that return 25,000 rows, and handle those rows and unset them before doing the next 25,000.

You'd do this with limit. Limit 0,24999 is the first 25000, then limit 25000,50000 should be the next lot.

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Instead of trying to rewrite the SQL queries, I'll just post a link to the PHP file that I am running into problems with: http://pastebin.com/JxCJnaGW. The first query returns 12,201 rows and the second query returns 2,179 rows. Please let me know if you need any more information.

If the query returns 12000 rows, you need to have the memory to store all those rows in somewhere. If you're looping through all the results and stuff them into a PHP array, then they all count towards the 64MB PHP memory limit:

while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) {
    $data[] = $row;
}

foreach ($data as $d) {
    echo $d['foo'];
    echo $d['bar'];
}

The $data array now needs to hold all 12000 results in memory, which will take up a significant part of your available 64MB, or may even exceed it. The more space conserving thing to do is to get the data from MySQL only as needed:

while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) {
    echo $row['foo'];
    echo $row['bar'];
}

Here you're only holding one row in memory at a time and get the next row from MySQL when needed. This shouldn't even come close to the memory limit.

That's only a small example. Every variable and every piece of data has to be stored somewhere. You need to be aware of this and optimize where necessary.

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up vote -1 down vote accepted

I was able to compress the code into one SQL query so it just uses MySQL to get the numbers instead of PHP + MySQL:

SELECT COUNT(*) AS 'total', COUNT(DISTINCT u.UniqueUserId) AS 'unique', ((COUNT(*) / (
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `Sessions` WHERE ApplicationId = '[appid]' AND StartApp BETWEEN '[start]' AND '[end]')) * 100) AS 'percent', u.LangID 
FROM `Sessions` AS s, `UniqueUsers` AS u
WHERE s.UniqueUserId = u.UniqueUserId AND s.ApplicationId = '[appid]' AND s.StartApp BETWEEN '[start]' AND '[end]'
GROUP BY u.LangID

Thanks!

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