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So, I am reading a bit about metaclasses in Python, and how type()'s three-argument alter-ego is used to dynamically create classes. However, the third argument is usually a dict that initializes the to-be created class' __dict__ variable.

If I want to dynamically create classes based on a metaclass that uses __slots__ instead of __dict__, how might I do this? Is type() still used in some fashion along with overriding __new__()?

As an FYI, I am aware of the proper uses for __slots__, to save memory when creating large numbers of a class versus abusing it to enforce a form of type-safety.


Example of a normal (new-style) class that sets __metaclass__ and uses a __dict__:

class Meta(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dctn):
        # Do something unique ...
        return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dctn)

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = Meta

    def __init__(self):
        pass


In the above, type.__new__() is called and the fourth argument (which becomes the third when actually used) creates a __dict__ in Foo. But if I wanted to modify Meta to include __slots__, then I have no dictionary to pass on to type()'s __new__() function (as far as I know -- I haven't tested any of this yet, just pondering and trying to find some kind of a use-case scenario).

Edit: A quick, but untested guess, is to take a dict of the values to be put into the __slots__ variables and pass it to type.__new__(). Then add an __init__() to Meta that populates the __slots__ variables from the dict. Although, I am not certain how that dict would reach __init__(), because the declaration of __slots__ prevents __dict__ from being created unless __dict__ is defined in __slots__...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't create a type with a non-empty __slots__ attribute. What you can do is insert a __slots__ attribute into the new class's dict, like this:

class Meta(type): 
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dctn):
         dctn['__slots__'] = ( 'x', )
         return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dctn)

 class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = Meta

    def __init__(self):
        pass 

Now Foo has slotted attributes:

foo = Foo() 
foo.y = 1

throws

 AttributeError: 'Foo' object has no attribute 'y'
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This looks interesting. I'll try it in a few minutes. –  Kumba Mar 11 '12 at 11:16
    
Never got around to testing this, but I think this technically answers the question. I'll figure it out one day. –  Kumba May 22 '12 at 3:11

dctn in your example of a metaclass is the class dictionary, not the instance dictionary. __slots__ replaces the instance dictionary. If you create two examples:

class Meta(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dctn):
        return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dctn)

class Foo1(object):
    __metaclass__ = Meta

class Foo2(object):
    __metaclass__ = Meta
    __slots__ = ['a', 'b']

Then:

>>> f1 = Foo1()
>>> f2 = Foo2()
>>> f1.__dict__ is Foo1.__dict__
False
>>> f2.__dict__
Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
AttributeError: 'Foo2' object has no attribute '__dict__'
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1  
Okay, I am still learning the ropes on Python here and am starting to wrap my head around Python's mantra of "everything is an object" (similar to UNIX's "everything is a file"). Is it not possible to define __slots__ in the Metaclass and have it propagated to classes created from the metaclass? Or is this where a base class becomes more useful? Or, would I want to combine both concepts? –  Kumba Mar 11 '12 at 10:43
    
Good question. You certainly could define __slots__ in the metaclass simply by adding to dctn. However, subclassing from a base class would usually be a better approach. Generally, if you're not sure if you need a metaclass, then you don't. –  aquavitae Mar 11 '12 at 10:59
    
That's why I am trying to learn about metaclasses a bit more, so I can determine if I really do need them or not. Note, I am coming off of a background in .NET where I had to contend with generics, interfaces, and single-inheritance, and never had formal training in OOP (just a few classes on good old C). Trying to understand Python's rather....unique differences is proving to be quite interesting at times. Much like one finds a way to convert a spork into a trebuchet that launches brussel sprouts across the table while at dinner. –  Kumba Mar 11 '12 at 11:16

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