Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If i use magic __set to set a value to private var how could i set a var as an array ?

Im thinking of something like this, pretend i have a class with __get __set

$myclass->names = 'Name'; // Works
$myclass->names = array('n1'=>'Name1', 'n2' => 'Name2'); // works as well

//this does not work
$myclass->names['n1'] = 'Name1';
$myclass->names['n2'] = 'Name2';

Its the 2 last examples i want to get to work. Have tested various ways but cant figure it out.

share|improve this question
    
Do you get an error or warning? –  Ofir Baruch Mar 11 '12 at 10:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It won't work. $class->arr['key'] will execute the getter. So basically, what your code will look like is:

array('key' => 'value')['key'] = 'new value';

Which, obviously, does nothing. If you want that to work, you will have to declare the names as a public property.

share|improve this answer
1  
While you're right about "it won't work", you're explanation of why is plain wrong. –  rodneyrehm Mar 11 '12 at 10:57

You obviously don't output notices, otherwise you'd have gotten the error

Notice: Indirect modification of overloaded property Foo::$bar has no effect

What you're trying to do is simply not possible. There is exactly one way to make arrays received through __get writable, but that is most likely not what you want.

<?php

class Foo {
    protected $bar = array();

    public function &__get($name) {
        return $this->$name;
    }

    public function __set($name, $value) {
        return $this->$name = $value;
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->bar = array('a', 'b', 'c');
echo $foo->bar[0]; // output "a"
$foo->bar[0] = 'z'; // fires warning
echo $foo->bar[0]; // output "z"

// all fine, but here's the catch:
$t =& $foo->bar;
$t = array('y');
echo $foo->bar[0]; // output "y"

Now that you've seen how returning values by reference can be a problem, you may be interested in ArrayObject. Something like

<?php

class Foo {
    protected $bar = array();

    public function __get($name) {
        return new ArrayObject(&$this->$name);
    }

    public function __set($name, $value) {
        return $this->$name = $value;
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->bar = array('a', 'b', 'c');
echo $foo->bar[0]; // output "a"
$foo->bar[0] = 'z'; // fires warning
echo $foo->bar[0]; // output "z"

// all fine, and no catch
$t =& $foo->bar;
$t = array('y');
echo $foo->bar[0]; // still outputs "z"
share|improve this answer
    
Yes i got some error in output but since i worked with this last time on friday i had forgotten about it. Im instead using now public var which works as supposed –  DanelK Mar 11 '12 at 11:17

This expression will invoke the getter:

 $myclass->names['n1'] = 'Name1';
 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 needs to be get
                ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                assignment later

The only way to make that work is a fugly workaround. By letting the getter return an reference to the know array the following assignment could work.

 function & __get($name) {

     if (is_array($this->$name)) {
          return & $this->$name;
     }
     else ...
 }

So it's really only advisable if it significantly simplifies your API otherwise.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.