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When I create a Date from parsing a String and access the day of the month, I get the wrong value.

Date datearr = null;
DateFormat df1 = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy");
String dataa = "17-03-2012";
try {
    datearr = df1.parse(dataa);
} catch (ParseException e) {
    Toast.makeText(this, "err", 1000).show();
}

int DPDMonth = datearr.getMonth() + 1;
int DPDDay = datearr.getDay();
int DPDYear = datearr.getYear() + 1900;

System.out.println(Integer.toString(DPDDay)+"-"+Integer.toString(DPDMonth)+"-"+Integer.toString(DPDYear));

Why do I get 0 instead of 17?

03-11 10:24:44.286: I/System.out(2978): 0-3-2012
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3  
Read the javadoc of the methods you use, notice their deprecation warning, and replace by the code that the documentation suggests. And also, think about what would happen if you had a ParseException, when the code datearr.getMonth() is executed. –  JB Nizet Mar 11 '12 at 10:55
2  
And please use the java conventions related to variable naming... it is highly annoying trying to read code and have a variable highlighted as a class. –  Marcelo Mar 11 '12 at 11:06
    
Sorry, its my first post in here. –  Anton Safonov Mar 11 '12 at 11:14
    
You'll get more value out of SO if you do [a little research]() on your question and include what you've found. That way we know what you've tried and where you're stuck. –  David Harkness Mar 11 '12 at 11:19
    
Thanks, I hope my next post will be more serious. I inattentive at this time , sorry –  Anton Safonov Mar 11 '12 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a snippet the doesn't use deprecated methods anymore, fixes naming issues and simplifies the output.

    Date datearr = null;
    DateFormat df1 = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy");
    String dataa = "17-03-2012";
    try {
        datearr = df1.parse(dataa);
    } catch (ParseException e) {
        Toast.makeText(this, "err", 1000).show();
        return;  // do not continue in case of a parse problem!!
    }

    // "convert" the Date instance to a Calendar
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(datearr);

    // use the Calendar the get the fields
    int dPDMonth = cal.get(Calendar.MONTH)+1;
    int dPDDay = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
    int dPDYear = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);

    // simplified output - no need to create strings
    System.out.println(dPDDay+"-"+dPDMonth+"-"+dPDYear);
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Thanks, a lot!! –  Anton Safonov Mar 11 '12 at 12:00

You should use

int DPDDay = datearr.getDate();

getDay() return a day in week

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Zoon Nooz, thx! Sorry guys, all because of my carelessness –  Anton Safonov Mar 11 '12 at 11:19

This kind of work is much easier when using the third-party library, Joda-Time 2.3.

// © 2013 Basil Bourque. This source code may be used freely forever by anyone taking full responsibility for doing so.
// import org.joda.time.*;
// import org.joda.time.format.*;

String dateString = "17-03-2012";

DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern( "dd-MM-yyyy" );
DateTime dateTime = formatter.parseDateTime( dateString ).withTimeAtStartOfDay();

int dayOfMonth = dateTime.getDayOfMonth();
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