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I'm trying to create a Windows Form application that searches for a string and has three possible scenarios:

  1. String 1 found - wait
  2. String 2 found - stop
  3. Else - Perform action and wait 1 minute

I am encountering my problem only on the times when it is expected to wait. When this happens, the newTimer_Tick starts to tick every second. I have tried disabling the timer when it ticks and a few other things but none appeared to work. Below is the code:

public void Action(string result)
{
    if (result.Contains("string1"))
    {
        // Check again in 10 + x seconds
        int n = new Random().Next(0, 5000);
        int newtime = 10000 + n;
        newTimer.Tick += new EventHandler(newTimer_Tick);
        newTimer.Interval = newtime;
        newTimer.Enabled = true;
    }
    else if (result.Contains("string2"))
    {
        // Turn off
        newTimer.Enabled = false;
    }
    else
    {
        // Perform action and tick again in 1min + x seconds
        action1();

        int n = new Random().Next(0, 5000);
        int newtime = 600000 + n;
        newTimer.Tick += new EventHandler(newTimer_Tick);
        newTimer.Interval = newtime;
        newTimer.Enabled = true;
    }
}

private void newTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Action( result );
}

What have I done wrong?

share|improve this question
    
When timer fired every second - what is the Interval value? –  Jacob Seleznev Mar 11 '12 at 13:00
    
Use a TimeSpan when you want to represent time values, not an int. That way you would avoid unit ambiguities (are you counting seconds, milliseconds, hours, ticks, ...?) –  jv42 Mar 11 '12 at 13:04
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Each time the following line is called, an new instance of the event handler newTimerTick is added to the invocation list for the Tick event:

newTimer.Tick += new System.EventHandler(newTimer_Tick);

So every time the time tick goes off newTimerTick is going to be called multiple times, which is going to give you unexpected results.

Configure your event handler once only. In the constructor would be a sensible place.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and while it appears to have slowed the rate of duplication, it hasn't stopped entirely. –  Mr Wednesday Mar 11 '12 at 13:27
    
If you have configured the timer Tick event handler from the designer then you don't need to explicitly do it in the constructor. It's already done in InitializeComponent. –  Phil Mar 11 '12 at 13:42
    
Yeah, this is what appears to have happened. I'm testing now, will advise if the problem is gone. –  Mr Wednesday Mar 12 '12 at 2:43
    
After some testing, problem seems to be gone, thank you for your help. Problem was caused by me manually adding the Tick event when I didn't know that Designer had added it. This caused duplication on each Tick. –  Mr Wednesday Mar 12 '12 at 2:49
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Have you tried to stop the timer with the Timer.Stop method?

Btw: I don't think you need to reassign the Tick event from the newTimer unless you don't create a new Timer everytime.

share|improve this answer
2  
Calling the Start method is the same as setting Enabled to true. Likewise, calling the Stop method is the same as setting Enabled to false. –  Jacob Seleznev Mar 11 '12 at 13:01
    
@JacobSeleznev True that –  Robar Mar 11 '12 at 17:21
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I think what you were missing is that you have to stop your timer since you don't actually want it to keep for more than one interval. You seem to want to run it once, check on the result and then decide if you want to keep running it or not. Here's the code:

  public void action(string result)
    {
        int n = new Random().Next(0, 5000);
        Boolean blActivateTimer = true;
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.Tick += timer_Tick;
        if (!result.Contains("string1") && !result.Contains("string2"))
        {
            n += 600000;
            action1();
        }
        else
        {
            if (result.Contains("string1"))
            {
                n += 10000;
            }
            else
            {
                blActivateTimer = false;
            }
        }
        if (blActivateTimer)
        {
            timer.Start();
        }
    }
    void action1()
    {

    }
    void timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Timer t = (Timer)sender;
        t.Stop();
        action(result);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not seeing what this does differently to how I originally had it, aside from creating a new timer instead of reusing the same timer instance. –  Mr Wednesday Mar 12 '12 at 0:46
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