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This code generates C2248 : 'A::B::ExceptionB' : cannot access private class declared in 'class A::B' in VS2008.

#include <iostream>

class A
{
    class ExceptionA{};

    class B
    {
        class ExceptionB{};
        public:
        B();
    };

    public:
    A(int);

};

A::B::B()
{
    throw ExceptionB();
}

A::A(int i)
{
    i % 2 ? throw ExceptionA() : throw A::B::ExceptionB();      //  C2248 !!
}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        A a(3);
    }
    catch( A::ExceptionA& )
    {
        std::cout << "A::ExceptionA" << std::endl;
    }
    catch( A::B::ExceptionB& )
    {
        std::cout << "A::B::ExceptionB" << std::endl;
    }
}

Of course, If I make the class ExceptionB{} public in B, the code compiles.

But I don't understand why the compiler does't complain about the 2 catch clauses in main(), as A::ExceptionA is a private class in A and A::B::ExceptionB is a private class in A::B.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The question is worded a bit strangely, so I'm assuming that you're asking why

i % 2 ? throw ExceptionA() : throw A::B::ExceptionB();

does not compile, while

catch( A::ExceptionA& )
catch( A::B::ExceptionB& )

does.

If you take a look at a copy of your handy dandy C++ standard (Chapter 11, paragraph 4), it says the following:

It should be noted that it is access to members and base classes that is controlled, not their visibility. Names of members are still visible, and implicit conversions to base classes are still considered, when those members and base classes are inaccessible.

The difference then in the above is that in the first case, you are trying to call a member of A::ExceptionA or A::B::ExceptionB -- the constructors for the exception. But in the catch statement, you're not accessing a member of any of those; you're only accessing the type name.


That said, I still believe this is a bug in MSVC++. The standard also says, in chapter 15.6 paragraph 1:

If the exception-declaration in a catch clause has class type, and the function in which the catch clause occurs does not have access to the destructor of that class, the program is ill-formed.

which your sample seems to violate, yet MSVC++ is accepting it without complaint.

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You're right. If I replace catch( A::ExceptionA& ) with catch( A::ExceptionA& a) the compiler complains. You mentioned chapter 15.6 in the Standard, but I can't find it, at least in the Standard Latest draft N3225. Could you confirm 15.6 paragraph 1 ? –  Belloc Mar 11 '12 at 15:27
    
@user1042389: I'm looking at C++03 here. –  Billy ONeal Mar 11 '12 at 15:31
    
Thanks. I'm giving you the credit for the answer. –  Belloc Mar 11 '12 at 15:33

Both exceptions are private and g++, clang, and EDG all complain about it. That is, it probably an error in C++ to use them as you did but your compiler seems to be wrong about allowing the code. However, the section on exception handling actually doesn't explicitly state that the exception being caught needs to have specific access (after all, the private class would be accessible in a member of 'A'). I guess that this led the developers into not checking this access.

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