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If one includes windows.h in a c++ file in Visual Studio, they then have a global identifier named STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL defined. I would like to use that name as a name for a static member variable in a class I am creating. I attempted to do it as follows...

class ACLAmigo
{
public:
    static int STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL;
    ACLAmigo(void);
    ~ACLAmigo(void);
};

Later on in another file I have this...

int ACLAmigo::STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL = 1;

But the IDE complains thusly: "Error: expected an identifier".

Question: Can I use this already declared identifier STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL as a member variable name and if so how?

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2  
STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL is probably a macro. You could #undef it, but you may be asking for trouble. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 11 '12 at 14:47
    
Thanks in fact it is a "#define STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL (0x001F0000L)". I actually can't undef it because I then want to set my variable to this value using the macro name (a #define is a macro right?). If I add an underscore in front of my variable name it works. I will live with that if I must but it would be nice not to have to. –  John Fitzpatrick Mar 11 '12 at 14:49
    
I've added an answer that deals with that problem. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 11 '12 at 15:00
1  
It is customary to have macros be all caps to set them apart from regular variables. This all come to waste if you use all caps for regular variables, of course, so I would advise against doing that: this way you will avoid clashes. StandardRightsAll or standar_rights_all would work as well, would not they ? –  Matthieu M. Mar 11 '12 at 15:23
    
Yes, thanks those names would work just fine. I wanted consistency between the name in windows.h and the name I used but now I see that was an impossible dream. Learning while doing... –  John Fitzpatrick Mar 11 '12 at 17:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL (and most of the other things) is the macro. Macros are always "globally defined". Moreover, they're resolved by the preprocessor before the compiler starts to analyze your code so that your code turns into:

static int 0x001F0000 /*STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL*/;

which is a nonsense.

Either pick another variable name, or undefine that macro:

#undef STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL
static int STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL; // now it's ok
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Thanks. I'm changing the name of my variable. Branching question: Is it considered a standard/best practice to give constant static class members names with all caps? –  John Fitzpatrick Mar 11 '12 at 17:49
    
Depends on the convention. I personally don't so this. I do stick to the convention where static members come with s_ prefix –  valdo Mar 11 '12 at 20:28

Well, since STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL is actually a macro:

#define STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL              (0x001F0000L)

I'd say there's no safe way of doing it.

You could undefine it:

#undef STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL
class ACLAmigo
{
public:
    static int STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL;
    ACLAmigo(void);
    ~ACLAmigo(void);
};

but you're much better off if you just choose a different name.

In fact, it's undefined behavior to undefine standard macros. This isn't a standard macro, but could also lead to undefined behavior. You should definitely change the name.

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Thanks. I'm changing the name of my variable. Branching question: Is it considered a standard/best practice to give constant static class members names with all caps? –  John Fitzpatrick Mar 11 '12 at 17:48

In your example, you set it to 1, but I'm thinking you actually want to set it to the value that the STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL macro normally has.

I think you could accomplish that like this:

class ACLAmigo
{
public:
    static const int standard_rights_all = STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL;
#undef STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL
    static const int STANDARD_RIGHTS_ALL = standard_rights_all;
    ACLAmigo(void);
    ~ACLAmigo(void);
};

but this could easily lead to problems if this occurs in a header file that gets included before other header files that use the macro.

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