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I am trying to call a private method from within the native implementation of another method like this:

jclass cls = (*env)->GetObjectClass(env, obj);
jmethodID output_mid = (*env)->GetMethodID(env, cls, "methodName", "(Ljava/lang/String;)V");
if (output_mid == 0)
{
    // Exit
}

This is giving me a "method not found" exception. From what I gather, the class object must correspond to the class where the target method was defined, because it is private.

Indeed if I change the access modifier to protected, the fault disappears. Also from the logs, I see GetObjectClass returned the runtime class, not the base class. So, my question is: how to get the correct base class, in JNI?

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After your native code returns to Java, you should receive an exception. Can you post the exception? –  Java42 Mar 11 '12 at 19:42
    
Not word for word, because I'd have to reintroduce the bug, which I am lazy to do, but I think it was an instance of MethodNotFoundException saying that 'methodName' does not exist. Thanks. –  Panayiotis Karabassis Mar 11 '12 at 20:30
    
@PanayiotisKarabassis out of curiosity does the single change from private to protected fix your problem? –  jogabonito Mar 12 '12 at 6:01
    
@jogabonito Yes it does. –  Panayiotis Karabassis Mar 12 '12 at 10:09
    
@ChuckFricano It was a NoSuchMethodError. –  Panayiotis Karabassis Mar 12 '12 at 10:20
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's a JNI function getSuperClass() that you can use to obtain the correct class in this case. In the general case of knowing that a private method is defined in some superclass, you might need to walk the inheritance tree checking each superclass up to the root.

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Ah, thanks, I suspected that, it's easier to change the modifier to protected. :-) –  Panayiotis Karabassis Mar 11 '12 at 20:30
1  
From the Java documentation. "The JNI does not enforce class, field, and method access control restrictions that can be expressed at the Java programming language level through the use of modifiers such as private and final." I don't see how adding protected or using getSuperClass() would fix this problem. –  Java42 Mar 11 '12 at 20:45
    
i agree with @ChuckFricano, that changing the visibility shouldn't help. But if it does work, who am I to say no :-) –  jogabonito Mar 12 '12 at 6:01
    
@jogabonito, I tested this and the olny way to get the MethodNotFoundException was to to misspell the method name or signature. It worked when the target Java method was in the base class, superclass, abstract superclass, private, public etc. –  Java42 Mar 12 '12 at 6:10
    
Perhaps you are right, the Exception may be thrown when the method is called. "When these functions are used to call private methods and constructors, the method ID must be derived from the real class of obj, not from one of its superclasses." Source: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/jni/spec/functions.html –  Panayiotis Karabassis Mar 12 '12 at 10:19
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