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I wrote the code below and I was expecting that, when the first loop ends and doesn't return False, the flow would follow to the second while loop. However, the flow skips the second while loop and simply returns True. Why is that? How can I fix this problem, making the flow after the first while loop go to the second while loop?

square = [[1,2,3,4],[4,3,1,4],[3,1,2,4],[2,4,4,3]]
# this is an auxiliary function
def getSum(lis):
sum = 0
for e in lis:        
    sum = sum + e
return sum

# here is where the problem is
def check_game(square):
standardSum = getSum(range(1, len(square)+1))    

while square: #this is the first while loop
    row = square.pop()
    print row, 'row', 'sum of row=', getSum(row)
    if standardSum != getSum(row):
        return False
m = 0
while m < len(square): # the second while loop, which the flow skips 
    n = 0
    col = []
    while n < len(square):
        col.append(square[n][m])
        n = n + 1
    print col, 'column'
    if standardSum != getSum(col):
        print standardSum, ' and sum of col =', getSum(col)
        return False            
    m = m + 1
return True 
share|improve this question
2  
Check the indentation here matches your actual code – Aram Kocharyan Mar 11 '12 at 17:51
    
+1 @AramKocharyan: neither of the while loops is actually inside the check_game funciton. – James Youngman Mar 11 '12 at 18:02
    
Yes, I paste wrong, but in my .py file it's with the correct indentation. Thanks, Aram. – craftApprentice Mar 11 '12 at 18:08
    
I'm a bit reluctant to comment since I'm lying in bed on my phone, but the indentation doesn't look like valid py to me – Aram Kocharyan Mar 11 '12 at 18:08
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first loop only terminates when there are no more items left in square. After the first loop, len(square) will be 0, so the entry condition for the second loop m < len(square) will be False.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly! I didn't get it because of the .pop() that reduces the number of elements in square. – craftApprentice Mar 11 '12 at 18:09
1  
@Pythonista'sApprentice: Make sure you study the code in katriealalex' answer, which shows how you can write your function in a much more expressive, readable and concise manner. Try to understand that code, and you might learn a lot about Python! – Sven Marnach Mar 12 '12 at 0:39

FYI your code is very (very very very) un-idiomatic Python -- it's written much more like C.

Here's a rewrite which is much more like Python is normally written.

square = [[1,2,3,4],[4,3,1,4],[3,1,2,4],[2,4,4,3]]
transpose = lambda i: zip(*i)

def is_magic(square):
    n = len(square)
    s = n*(n+1)/2

    return all(sum(row) == s for row in square) and \
           all(sum(col) == s for col in transpose(square))

You may wish to look into numpy, which is a Python module for handling matrices. With it:

def is_magic(square):
    n = len(square)
    s = n*(n+1)/2

    return all(m.sum(0) == s) and all(m.sum(1) == s)
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I's like to understand this code... I've read it 5 times to get an idea... but it's not for me yet. Thank you very much, Katrielalex for this beautiful code! – craftApprentice Mar 17 '12 at 3:15
    
@Pythonista'sApprentice no worries. You should first wrap your head around list comprehensions. The transpose thing is just a trick. – katrielalex Mar 17 '12 at 11:55

while square: will terminate when square is empty; it follows that len(square) == 0, and thus m < len(square) evaluates to false when m=0.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly! I didn't get it because of the .pop() that reduces the number of elements in square. Thank you very much, guys! – craftApprentice Mar 11 '12 at 18:10

square.pop() returns a row from square and removes the row, therefore len(square) is zero in the second loop.

There is also a built-in function sum that does the same thing as your getSum function.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly! I didn't get it because of the .pop() that reduces the number of elements in square. – craftApprentice Mar 11 '12 at 18:10

You know how many times you plan to iterate because you check a length and an increment variable. Use a for loop instead, as it will allow you to initialize the increment and adjust it each loop on the same line. This will avoid issues resulting in infinite loops in the future (even though thisn't the problem here, I consider it relevant to point out).

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Thanks for the wise advise. – craftApprentice Mar 11 '12 at 18:11

You can avoid your error by replacing your first while with this:

for row in square:
  print row, 'row', 'sum of row=', getSum(row)
  if standardSum != getSum(row):
     return False
share|improve this answer

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