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I get the error: No appropriate default constructor for B. However, I don't understand why the compiler wants to call a default constructor, when I give the arguments ii and DONT want to call the default.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {
    int i;
public:
    A(int ii) { i = ii; cout << "Constructor for A\n"; }
    ~A() { cout << "Destructor for A\n"; }
    void f() const{}
};

class B {
    int i;
public:
    B(int ii) { i = ii; cout << "Constructor for B\n"; }
    ~B() { cout << "Destructor for B\n"; }
    void f() const{}
};

class C:public B {
    A a;
public:
    C() { cout << "Constructor for C\n"; }
    ~C() { cout << "Destructor for C\n"; }
    void f() const {
        a.f();
        B::f();
    }
};

class D:public B {
    C c;
public:
    D(int ii) { B(ii); cout << "Constructor for D\n"; }
    ~D() { cout << "Destructor for D\n"; }
};

int main() {
    D d(47);
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your parent constructor should be called in the initializer list:

class D:public B {
    C c;
public:
    D(int ii) : B(ii)/* <- */ { cout << "Constructor for D\n"; }
    ~D() { cout << "Destructor for D\n"; }
};

Note the /* <- */ comment. That needs to be changed.

What you are doing right now is to create an instance of B() in you class D constructor, which is not being used:

D(int ii) { B(ii); /* <- useless*/ }
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Got it.. Thanks –  talha099 Mar 11 '12 at 18:10
    
C also inherits from B. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 11 '12 at 18:13
    
It's the same solution, right? –  mfontanini Mar 11 '12 at 18:17
    
@fontanini Yeah –  talha099 Mar 11 '12 at 18:20
    
@fontanini yes. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 11 '12 at 18:20

This code:

class C:public B
{
    C() { cout << "Constructor for C\n"; }
};

attempts to call B's default constructor.

You might want:

class C:public B
{
    C() : B(0) { cout << "Constructor for C\n"; }
};

but that depends on your logic.

The following is also wrong:

 D(int ii) { B(ii); cout << "Constructor for D\n"; }

it should be

 D(int ii) : B(ii) { cout << "Constructor for D\n"; }

Calling the base class constructor in the body of the child class constructor merely creates a temporary object which doesn't do anything. To get the behavior you expect, you must call the constructor in the initializer list.

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You need to realize that base and member subobjects are constructed by the time you enter the body of your constructor! That is, if you have a base or a member which doesn't have a default you need to pass its argument in the member initializer list:

D(int ii): B(ii) { std::cout << "constructor for D\n"; }

The object you constructed in your body of the D constructor is just a temporary object which doesn't really serve any purpose in your case (temporary object may be useful in some cases, though).

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You're creating a D, which is derived from B -- but D's ctor doesn't pass a parameter to B's constructor, which would require that B have a default ctor.

To fix this, you typically need to write D to provide a parameter to B's ctor:

class D : public B { 
    C C;
public:
    D(int ii) : B(ii) { cout << "ctor for D\n"; }
};
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D(int ii) { B(ii); cout << "Constructor for D\n"; }

Calls the default constructor of B. The B(ii) creates an temporary object of B which gets destructed as soon as constructor of D returns, In short it does not call the constructor for Base class of object which is being constructed.

Solution:
To be able to call a particular constructor of your Base class you should use Member Initializer list.

D(int ii) : B(ii)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
C also inherits from B. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 11 '12 at 18:13
1  
@LuchianGrigore: No wonder it has the same problem. OP is unaware of member initializer lists and i think the answer points it out.OPs comments indicate S/He understands it through the answers here so I dont feel a compelling need to edit anything further. –  Alok Save Mar 11 '12 at 18:18
    
Fair enough, just pointing it out. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 11 '12 at 18:20

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