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I have a div that is deliberately smaller than its content (I'm making a sliding toggle widget). I want the container to have rounded corners. In FireFox, it renders as intended, but Chrome and Safari both show the inner content in the region between where the rounded corners are and where square corners would be. I can't put rounded corners on the inner content as there is no solution that is right for all scenarios (toggle left, toggle right, toggle in motion). Here's what I have so far:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" >
        <title>DIV test</title>

        <style type="text/css">
            body {
                font-size               : 3em;
            }
            #frame {
                border                  : thin solid black;
                /* background: #a0a0ff; */
            }
            #portal {
                background              : none;
                margin                  : 20px;
                display                 : inline-block;

                -moz-border-radius      : 29px;
                -webkit-border-radius   : 29px;
                -khtml-border-radius    : 29px;
                border-radius           : 29px;
                border                  : thin solid black;

                width                   : 400px;
                overflow                : hidden;
                height                  : 4em;
                line-height             : 4em;
            }
            #inner {
                position                : relative;
                width                   : 900px;
                background              : #a0ffa0;
                z-index                 : -100;
                margin-left             : -150px;
            }
        </style>

    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="frame">
            <div id="portal">
                <div id="inner">Here are some partially visible words</div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Is this a rendering bug in WebKit browsers, or am I doing something wrong and getting lucky with FireFox?

share|improve this question
    
Your css formatting is rather unusual. :) –  GEMI Mar 11 '12 at 18:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure if it's a bug, but it sucks. However, try this fix: http://jsfiddle.net/tpe36/1/

Works in Chrome and Firefox for me.

HTML:

<div id="frame">
    <div id="portal">
        <div id="container">                
            <div id="inner">Here are some partially visible words</div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#inner {
    position                : relative;
    width                   : 900px;
    z-index                 : 1;
    margin-left             : -150px;
}
#container {
    background              : #a0ffa0;
}
​
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I don't understand why that should make a difference, but it certainly does, thanks. Fingers crossed that it translates to the more complicated real code. –  Chris Mar 11 '12 at 19:13
    
The difference is that #container has the same width as #portal. #inner has no background-color, so you don't see that its corners are not rounded. –  Alex Mar 11 '12 at 19:19
    
After a little more thought, I don't think this will translate - the effect I'm striving for is very reliant on the colouring of the inner content (three differently styled spans) that I move around via margin-left on their parent. Styling a container that doesn't move (and matches the size of 'portal') isn't going to have the intended effect. You have certainly answered the question as presented though. –  Chris Mar 11 '12 at 19:19
    
Putting a sufficiently thick border on #frame of the same colour as the background and a z of -1 on #inner allows me to style the inner content as I'd like and the border obscures the unwanted rectangular protrusions. –  Chris Mar 11 '12 at 19:31
    
oh. maybe use an image as a wrapper? take a look at that: jsfiddle.net/tpe36/5 it's not perfect at all, the image is quick-and-dirty. but the idea should work. –  Alex Mar 11 '12 at 19:31

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