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In the latest C++ standard it implies that:

for (foo : bar)
    baz;

is equivilant to:

{
    auto && r = bar;
    for ( auto it = r.begin(), end = r.end(); it != end; ++it )
    {
        foo = *it;
        baz;
    }
}

When bar in the above is a function call that returns a collection, eg:

vector<string> boo();

ie

for (auto bo : boo())
    ...

Doesn't the line become:

auto&& r = boo();
...

And so the temporary return value of boo() is destroyed at the end of the statement "auto&&r=boo()", and then r is a hanging reference at the entry of the loop. ?? Is this reasoning correct? If not, why not?

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1  
First of all, vector<string> boo(); does NOT declare an object. It declares a function. Second, I don't understand your question. –  Nawaz Mar 11 '12 at 18:37
6  
Yes "vector<string> boo()" is the signature of an example function that returns a collection. The function is then called in the line below. –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 11 '12 at 18:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Is this reasoning correct? If not, why not?

It is correct up until this point:

And so the temporary return value of boo() is destroyed at the end of the statement "auto&&r=boo()" [...]

Binding a temporary to a reference extends its lifetime to be that of the reference. So the temporary lasts for the whole loop (that's also why there is an extra set of {} around the whole construct: to correctly limit the lifetime of that temporary).

This is according to paragraph 5 of §12.2 of the C++ standard:

The second context is when a reference is bound to a temporary. The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference except:

[various exceptions that don't apply here]

This is an interesting property that allows abusing the ranged-for loop for non-rangey things: http://ideone.com/QAXNf

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Do you have a standard reference for that? –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 11 '12 at 18:42
    
@user1131467 I provided the appropriate quote (I didn't lost the exceptions to the rule: the quote would be overly long.) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 11 '12 at 18:47

The reasoning is not correct because boo returns a temporary object by value. Binding this temporary object to a reference implies that the lifetime of the temporary is extended. Standard quote (§ 12.2/5):

[…] The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference […]

The reasoning would be correct if boo returned a reference. An example for an expression returning a reference to a temporary is string("a") += string("b"); using this value in a range-based for loop gives rise to undefined behavior.

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