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I am working with an xml that represents a sentence with its chunks and words. The problem is that in the xml I'm given words order is set according to its parent chunk, and not its order in the sentence. This is how the xml looks like:

<SENTENCE>
  <CHUNK ord="4">
    <CHUNK ord="2">
      <CHUNK ord="1">
        <WORD ord="0" />
      </CHUNK>
      <WORD ord="2" />
      <CHUNK ord="3">
        <WORD ord="0" />>
      </CHUNK>
    </CHUNK>
    <WORD ord="1" />
      <WORD ord="0" />
    <CHUNK ord="5">
      <WORD ord="0">
        <WORD ord="1" />
      </WORD>
      <CHUNK ord="6">
        <WORD ord="0">
          <WORD ord="2">
            <WORD ord="3" />
            <WORD ord="1" />
            </WORD>
        </WORD>
      </CHUNK>
    </CHUNK>
    <CHUNK ord="7">
      <WORD ord="0">
        <WORD ord="1" />
      </WORD>
    </CHUNK>
    <CHUNK ord="8">
      <WORD ord="0" />
    </CHUNK>
  </CHUNK>
</SENTENCE>

I need to know word's actual order in the sentence to make some other processing, but without losing the structure of the xml. For example, in the example given above, the output xml should be like the following:

<SENTENCE>
  <CHUNK ord="4">
    <CHUNK ord="2">
      <CHUNK ord="1">
        <WORD ord="0" senOrd="0" />
      </CHUNK>
      <WORD ord="2" senOrd="1" />
      <CHUNK ord="3">
        <WORD ord="0" senOrd="3" />>
      </CHUNK>
    </CHUNK>
    <WORD ord="1" senOrd="4" />
    <WORD ord="0" senOrd="5" />
    <CHUNK ord="7">
      <WORD ord="0" senOrd="12">
        <WORD ord="1" senOrd="13" />
      </WORD>
    </CHUNK>
    <CHUNK ord="8">
      <WORD ord="0" senOrd="14" />
    </CHUNK>
  </CHUNK>
  <CHUNK ord="5">
    <WORD ord="0" senOrd="6">
      <WORD ord="1" senOrd="7" />
    </WORD>
    <CHUNK ord="6">
      <WORD ord="0" senOrd="8">
        <WORD ord="2" senOrd="10">
          <WORD ord="3" senOrd="11" />
          <WORD ord="1" senOrd="9" />
        </WORD>
      </WORD>
    </CHUNK>
  </CHUNK>
</SENTENCE>

I've been trying to do that by using xslt to create a new attribute in every word element, which will show its order in the sentence, but I don't even know where to start from. If anyone could help me I would appreciate it.

Here is a possible xml given the english sentence "this is just an example of the xml":

<SENTENCE>
<CHUNK ord="1">
    <CHUNK ord="0">
        <WORD ord="1" form="is">
            <WORD ord="0" form="this" />
        </WORD>
    </CHUNK>
    <WORD ord="1" form="just">
    <CHUNK ord="2">
        <WORD ord="2" form="of">
            <WORD ord="0" form="an" />
        </WORD>
        <WORD ord="1" form="example" />
        <CHUNK ord="0">
            <WORD ord="1" form="xml" />
            <WORD ord="0" form="the" />
        </CHUNK>
    </CHUNK>
    </CHUNK>
</CHUNK>

What that senOrd attribute would indicate is the order each word has in the sentence.

share|improve this question
    
so is it correct to say that if you ordered the words in a sentence by the chunk's ord and then, within that, by the word's ord, you would have the ordering in the sentence? if so, then i guess you need to create an xpath that selects the data in that order, and then add the senOrd using a counter. the counter might have to be an argument to a recursive template that is incremented each call (since xslt is functional). but that's the limit of what i can remember about xslt [edit: oh, but you need to preserve order, so first add a attribute to record that and then rewrite/remove at end] – andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 19:43
    
I don't understand your description, I can observe that in your output senOrd is always ord + ord-of-parent Is that the rule that you need to implement? – David Carlisle Mar 11 '12 at 19:47
    
Maybe the example xml I post is not very complicated. But the real xml are much more complicated, as there are much more nested chunks and words (this xml files represent sentences after a grammatical analysis, so depending on the input sentence the output will be easier or not). – Ion Mar 11 '12 at 20:22
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you need to count all word elements that belong to chunk elements with a lower order themselves, plus all word elements with a lower ord attribute in the same chunk.

<xsl:value-of select="count(//WORD[ancestor::CHUNK[1]/@ord &lt; $currentOrd])
   + count(//WORD[ancestor::CHUNK[1]/@ord = $currentOrd][@ord &lt; current()/@ord])"/>

Where currentOrd is defined as follows:

<xsl:variable name="currentOrd" select="ancestor::CHUNK[1]/@ord"/>

So, given the following XSLT

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
   <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

   <xsl:template match="WORD">
      <xsl:variable name="currentOrd" select="ancestor::CHUNK[1]/@ord"/>
      <xsl:copy>
         <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
         <xsl:attribute name="senOrd">
            <xsl:value-of select="count(//WORD[ancestor::CHUNK[1]/@ord &lt; $currentOrd]) + count(//WORD[ancestor::CHUNK[1]/@ord = $currentOrd][@ord &lt; current()/@ord])"/>
         </xsl:attribute>
         <xsl:apply-templates/>
      </xsl:copy>
   </xsl:template>

   <xsl:template match="*|@*">
      <xsl:copy>
         <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
         <xsl:apply-templates/>
      </xsl:copy>
   </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied to your sample XML the following is output

<SENTENCE>
   <CHUNK ord="4">
      <CHUNK ord="2">
         <CHUNK ord="1">
            <WORD ord="0" senOrd="0"/>
         </CHUNK>
         <WORD ord="2" senOrd="1"/>
         <CHUNK ord="3">
            <WORD ord="0" senOrd="2"/>
         </CHUNK>
      </CHUNK>
      <WORD ord="1" senOrd="4"/>
      <WORD ord="0" senOrd="3"/>
      <CHUNK ord="5">
         <WORD ord="0" senOrd="5">
            <WORD ord="1" senOrd="6"/>
         </WORD>
         <CHUNK ord="6">
            <WORD ord="0" senOrd="7">
               <WORD ord="2" senOrd="9">
                  <WORD ord="3" senOrd="10"/>
                  <WORD ord="1" senOrd="8"/>
               </WORD>
            </WORD>
         </CHUNK>
      </CHUNK>
      <CHUNK ord="7">
         <WORD ord="0" senOrd="11">
            <WORD ord="1" senOrd="12"/>
         </WORD>
      </CHUNK>
      <CHUNK ord="8">
         <WORD ord="0" senOrd="13"/>
      </CHUNK>
   </CHUNK>
</SENTENCE>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tim. I've been proving your xslt with some of the xml files I have and it works like charm (and now that I see your response it wasn't that complicated). Thanks to David and Andrew too for their help and I apologize if I confused you two with my bad explanations (my english is not as good as I would like). – Ion Mar 11 '12 at 22:17

I'm not sure if your problem description, but this produces the requested output

<xsl:stylesheet  version="1.0"
         xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">


<xsl:template match="*|@*">
 <xsl:copy>
  <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="word/@ord">
 <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
 <xsl:attribute name="senOrd">
  <xsl:value-of select=". + ancestor::chunk[1]/@ord"/>
 </xsl:attribute>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
It works with the first example, but with the one I've just posted doesn't. – Ion Mar 11 '12 at 20:31
    
I am sorry I could not understand your problem description at all so just made sonething that workd on the example. If you edit your question to describe in words how to calculate the number you want to put in semOrd then I or someone could surely post the answer. the problem (for me at least) is nothing to do with xslt, I just have no idea what sum the xslt is supposed to encode. – David Carlisle Mar 11 '12 at 21:09
    
i think my comment described what is needed. the chunks are ordered. then, within the chunks, the words are ordered. what is needed is a sequential index that follows that ordering. of course, it doesn't help that in the second example chunk ordering starts at 1, or that some senOrd values are missing, or that lon never bothered to reply to me. but if you look at the examples, they are consistent with what i suggest. – andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 21:28
    
from that description I'd expect that semOrd values were all the values from 0 to 1 less than the number of words in the sentence, so specifying an absolute ordering of the words, but the values in the requested result don't include all the numbers where is senOrd="2" is there no third word? I'm confused:-) – David Carlisle Mar 11 '12 at 21:35
    
oh, ok, good point. so, i think my hypothesis is the closest you can get, modulo incompetence, and i understand your frustration (although i don't share it because it's sunday afternoon and i have just had a beer and am about to go cook dinner ;o) – andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 21:40

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