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The reason I'm asking is because I finished a lovely homepage design and only viewed the website in chrome and safari on osx then I decided to open firefox and certain things broke.

Also an issue I was having with search field placeholder text displaying wrong colour had vanished and displayed the correct colour I stated in my stylesheet in firefox.

It would be great if I could just create separate style sheets for different browsers or have conditional statements that would trigger the correct settings depending on the browser.

Also a great tool for viewing my site in multiple browsers manually would be great.

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To view a screenshot of your site across multiple browsers you can try browsershots.org –  Telmo Marques Mar 11 '12 at 19:55
    
my url is on local so it wouldn't work –  LondonGuy Mar 11 '12 at 19:55
2  
If you're already using a reset, and you're having cross-browser differences, it might be best to investigate the underlying reasons, rather than just try to fix it with browser sniffing. Typically, with most CSS these days, most code will give very similar results across Webkit, Firefox, Opera and IE9. Older versions of IE will probably benefit from specific shims. Nine out of ten times, it's possible to figure out why something is different in Firefox, say, and fix it using the same CSS for all browsers, rather than targeting. –  Matt Gibson Mar 11 '12 at 21:21
1  
@TomS Have you tried browserling.com ? Definitely my new go-to browser testing site. Won't help LondonGuy, though; as with browsershots, it will need to be able to see the pages on the web. For local testing, I just use multiple browsers on a Mac and a couple of Windows virtual machines for different versions of IE... –  Matt Gibson Mar 11 '12 at 21:27
    
If your want to test your site hosted on localhost try BrowseEmAll –  daniel.herken Mar 13 '12 at 8:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since usually the problems are with IEs, there is a solution for that.
The next line, which you can put inside the head tags, will loads a specific CSS only if you use IE7

<!--[if IE 7]>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://your.css/my.css" />
<![endif]-->

Same approach for other IEs.

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2  
Paul Irish's solution for this, also using conditional comments, is quite neat, as you can use a single stylesheet for everything. –  Matt Gibson Mar 11 '12 at 21:30

Some people prefer to approach this differently by using a CSS reset file. Basically, that establishes a neutral starting point so that any CSS you apply will have the same, predictable result on all browsers.

One of the simplest versions, which will give you a general idea of the concept, is this:

* {
     padding:0;
     margin:0;
   }

There is a lot of discussion about this in the answers to this SO question.

And here is a roundup of links to various common approaches.

Edit: for testing in various browsers, check out this popular SO question , and this one.

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I'm already using Eric Meyer's. Works well –  LondonGuy Mar 11 '12 at 20:11

If you use javascript you can put this code snippet inside your head tag to detect the user agent

<script type="text/javascript">
var browser={
    msie:navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE') > -1 ? true : false,
    chrome:navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Chrome') > -1 ? true : false,
    opera:navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Opera') > -1 ? true : false,
    firefox:navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Firefox') > -1 ? true : false
}
if(browser.msie) document.write("<link REL='stylesheet' HREF='msie.css' TYPE='text/css'>");
if(browser.chrome) document.write("<link REL='stylesheet' HREF='chrome.css' TYPE='text/css'>");
if(browser.opera) document.write("<link REL='stylesheet' HREF='opera.css' TYPE='text/css'>");
if(browser.firefox) document.write("<link REL='stylesheet' HREF='firefox.css' TYPE='text/css'>");
</script>
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3  
Browser sniffing is unreliable, hard to maintain and generally just plain evil –  steveax Mar 11 '12 at 22:04

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