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I have a table as below;

<table id="mytable">
    <tr>
        <td>cola1</td>
        <td>cola2</td>
        <td>cola3</td>
        <td class="rem">cola4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>colb1</td>
        <td>colb2</td>
        <td>colb3</td>
        <td class="rem">colb4</td>
    </tr>
</table>

<button id="but">Add Row</button>

A button <button id="but">mybutton</button> is placed at bottom of table, which on click, adds a new row to the table. The last column of rows have class rem, which has a function to remove the parent row on click.

Here is the javascript

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#but').click(function() {
        row = $("<tr></tr>");
        col1 = $('<td>colex1</td>');
        col2 = $('<td>colex2</td>');
        col3 = $('<td>colex3</td>');
        col4 = $('<td class="rem">colex4</td>');
        row.append(col1,col2,col3,col4).prependTo("#mytable");
    });

    $('.rem').click(function() {
        var $button = $(this);
        var $row = $button.closest('tr');
        $row.fadeOut('slow');
    });
});

The function work well in above two rows. But remove button is not working in rows added by jQuery. How can I make the Javascript added rows work like others?

Here is the fiddle.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to use a delegated event handler, using on(), if you want it to apply to newly created elements. The way this works is by adding the handler to an element that already (and continues) to exist in the DOM, then in the handler, as the event bubbles up, it checks whether the event target matches the selector supplied to the on() function. If so, then it runs the handler otherwise it doesn't.

$('#mytable').on('click','.rem',function() {
  var $button = $(this);
  var $row = $button.closest('tr');
  $row.fadeOut('slow');
});
share|improve this answer
    
Or just add it when the field is created on click of the button. –  Jared Farrish Mar 11 '12 at 20:20
    
can you give me a fiddle please.. :) –  blasteralfred Ψ Mar 11 '12 at 20:27
    
I forked yours: jsfiddle.net/D5Ftn –  tvanfosson Mar 11 '12 at 20:30

I think a lot of it comes down to how you handle the functionality. You could use $.on() or some other listener, but I don't think it's necessary if you know when you're adding the element and it's entirely under your control.

For instance:

EDIT - Fixed having the click handler on the row, put it on the .rem element instead.

$(document).ready(function() {
    var $row = $("<tr>"),
        $col1 = $('<td>colex1</td>'),
        $col2 = $('<td>colex2</td>'),
        $col3 = $('<td>colex3</td>'),
        $col4 = $('<td class="rem">colex4</td>');

    var addrow = function() {
        $row.clone(true).prependTo("#mytable");
    };

    var removerow = function() {
        var $button = $(this),
            $row = $button.closest('tr');

        $row.fadeOut('slow');
    };

    $row.append($col1, $col2, $col3, $col4);
    // This could be $($col4).click(removerow);, too.
    $row.find('.rem').click(removerow);

    $('#but').click(addrow);
    $('.rem').click(removerow);
});

http://jsfiddle.net/sM2R8/4/

Now this uses caching of the new $row with a $.clone(true) to copy the click handlers that have been added. If you want to change the values, you'll need to clone and then update those values, but that's just a nuance to how you want to handle this. You could, also, just add the removerow handler to the cloned element before/after you append it to the table, too.

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Try this:

$('#mytable').on('click', '.rem', function() {
  var $button =$(this);
  // ...
});

By doing that, you establish a handler on the table itself that listens for events bubbling up from contained elements. The second argument is a selector against which the actual target element is tested. If it matches (in this case, if it's a "remove" button), then your handler function is called.

Thus you can add as many rows as you like, and each new button's events will be intercepted by the same handler.

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Your click handler works on existing rows only because they do exist when you call it. For future elements not in the DOM though you need to use a delegation method that accounts for both current and future elements. To do this use on() delegated to the table ( or element further up that will always exist) and add the button class as selector

$('#mytable').on('click','.rem',function() {
   var $button = $(this);
  var $row = $button.closest('tr');
  $row.fadeOut('slow');
});
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You can use

.live(event, handler)

In this case event handler will be attached to the future elements also. so use:

$('.rem').live('click', function() {
  var $button = $(this);
  var $row = $button.closest('tr');
  $row.fadeOut('slow');
});

However as of jQuery 1.7 live() is deprecated, use on()

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1  
Unless you're using a really old version of jQuery, don't use .live(). It's deprecated. Even if you have a moderately old version, you'd use .delegate() instead of .live(). –  squint Mar 11 '12 at 20:35
    
Well, first, $.live() is deprecated, and if you review my answer (or really the $.on(), if you want to be picky), you'll notice that's not necessarily true. –  Jared Farrish Mar 11 '12 at 20:35
    
@JaredFarrish is right. To say you must use it is flat out wrong. –  squint Mar 11 '12 at 20:37
    
+1 Thanks! Didn't know live() is deprecated. Actually I am hosting the latest version of jQuery and live is functioning perfectly. –  lukas.pukenis Mar 11 '12 at 20:37
    
@MarkBrittingham: By easy to understand, I assume you mean nearly always misunderstood, and therefore abused. –  squint Mar 11 '12 at 20:38

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