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I have the following two buttons:

 jButton2.addActionListener(new java.awt.event.ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {

            Thread t = new Thread() {
                public void run() {
                    StreamingExperiment.streamingExperimentMain();
                }
            };
            t.setName("runThread");
            t.start();

        }
    });

and

 jButton3.setText("Cancel");
    jButton3.addActionListener(new java.awt.event.ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {

        }
    });

JButton3 is actually a cancel button which has to cancel the ongoing StreamingExperiment. How I am supposed to stop ongoing thread in this situation?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

You'd have the JButton's ActionListener call:

jButton3.addActionListener(new java.awt.event.ActionListener() {
    public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {
        StreamingExperiment.stop();
    }
});

You'll of course need to give StreamingExperiment this method whose contents will all depend on what StreamingExperiment does. If it has a loop, then perhaps stop() can change a boolean that you use to exit the loop.

By the way, it looks like StreamingExperiment has a static method, and you might want to fix this (unless it represents a variable, not a class in which case you should have its name start with a lower-case letter).

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You can't just stop any thread*. You can try interrupting it:

t.interrupt();

But the thread has to be able to handle it. This brings a question, what does:

StreamingExperiment.streamingExperimentMain();

actually do? If it performs CPU intensive operations, the thread must periodically check isInterrupted() flag and terminate if it happens to be set. If it waits on I/O or sleeps, chances are it will just work - see InterruptedException.

Well, technically you can, but this method is deprecated for a reason.

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