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Now, I know that I cannot stop someone from downloading my videos and sharing, however I would prefer to have it to so that people do not copy paste links directly to my bucket. Thus, is there a way to make my bucket accessible only from my server/domain making the request?

If it helps, I'm using jwplayer which loads from a xml playlist that has all the links. This playlist definitely can be opened and viewed from anywhere and is where I expect the easy copy and paste comes from.

I don't want to mask the urls because that means my bucket is readable to everyone. There is probably some chance that someone will find the url of my bucket and the name of the files and connect everything together...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is possible by Using Bucket Policies, which allows you to define access rights for Amazon S3 resources - there are a couple of Example Cases for Amazon S3 Bucket Policies illustrating the functionality, and amongst these you'll find an example for Restricting Access to Specific IP Addresses as well:

This statement grants permissions to any user to perform any S3 action on objects in the specified bucket. However, the request must originate from the range of IP addresses specified in the condition.

Depending on the specifics of your use case, a bucket policy for this might look like so:

{
    "Version": "2008-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Principal": {
                "AWS": "*" 
            },
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucket/*",
            "Condition" : {
                "IpAddress" : {
                    "aws:SourceIp": "192.168.143.0/24" 
                },
                "NotIpAddress" : {
                    "aws:SourceIp": "192.168.143.188/32" 
                } 
            } 
        } 
    ]
}

As shown the aws:sourceIp value for parameters IPAddress and NotIpAddress is expressed in CIDR notation, enabling respective flexibility for composing the desired scope.

Finally, you might want to check out the recommended AWS Policy Generator, select type S3 Bucket Policy and explore the available Actions and Conditions to compose more targeted policies for your use case eventually - the documentation for Conditions explains this in detail.

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Thanks Steffen, just wondering, instead of a ip address, can I make it from a domain name? Turns out I have to pay monthly to get a unique ip for my shared hosting... –  Matt Mar 12 '12 at 7:28
    
@Ali: I'm afraid this is not available as such (despite being an obvious use case indeed); I've updated the closing paragraphs of my answer regarding the CIDR notation in use for aws:sourceIp as well as other conditions available and explorable via the AWS Policy Generator - the former might allow you to specify all IP address blocks your provider might be using (if documented), thus reducing the hot linking surface considerably already. Whether this is feasible at all depends on your use case and environment (i.e provider) of course. –  Steffen Opel Mar 12 '12 at 8:05
    
See the arulraj.net's answer for domain specific permissions. I know this is two years later, but this comment through off my search so I thought I'd update it. –  Daniel M 19 hours ago

The Ip address will help if your server going to access your bucket. But JWPlayer is from client side. So the request is directly goes from jwplayer(browser) to s3 bucket url, Not via your server. In this case "referrer bucket policy" will help you in this.

{
"Version": "2008-10-17",
"Statement": [
  {
    "Sid": "1",
    "Effect": "Deny",
    "Principal": {
      "AWS": "*"
    },
    "Action": "s3:GetObject",
    "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::yourbucketname/*",
    "Condition": {
      "StringNotLike": {
        "aws:Referer": [
          "http://yoursitename.com/*",
          "http://*.yoursitename.com/*"
        ]
      }
    }
  }
]
}

So now s3 will allow if that request come from your site only.

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You can have your bucket protected, which is by default the way it is. (meaning you only have access to objects in it) Then you can request files from Amazon S3 from your website and give it a time limit to which the user can see it.

//set time so that users can see file for 1 minute. then it is protected again.
$response = $s3->get_object_url(YOUR_A3_BUCKET, PATH/TO/FILE, '1 minutes');

This will automatically give you a url that has parameters associated with it which only is accessible for 1 minute. You can use that as your source within your website and then they could not copy and paste it into the browser after that 1 minute.

You can read more about this at the Amazon SDK for PHP

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