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I'm new to C# and VS, and I have a bizarre problem.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace ExampleApplication {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            FileInfo fi = new FileInfo("C:\\TEST.TXT");
            fi.Create();
            Console.WriteLine("File exists: {0}", fi.Exists);
        }
    }
}

This is my program, it creates a file TEST.TXT. When I run the program inside VS 2010 with the Debug -> Start Debugging command (F5), the program works fine and the file is created.

However if I build the solution then run the program from the .exe using cmd prompt:

C:\...\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\ExampleApplication\ExampleApplication\bin\Debug\ExampleApplication.exe

It runs outputting: File exists: true. But the file is not created. Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Does the file exist? –  M.Babcock Mar 11 '12 at 22:07
2  
Its propably a rights problem. Try running your exe with admin rights, and see if that works. –  dowhilefor Mar 11 '12 at 22:08
    
Are you sure it doesn't exist? The line fi.Create() explicitly creates the file. –  Chris Laplante Mar 11 '12 at 22:09
    
The file definitely doesn't exist. When I run it from within VS it is created fine. I've run the .exe with admin rights, still no fix. I've modified the program to write more information it now prints: –  Ricky Jones Mar 11 '12 at 22:13
    
File exists: True File name: C:\TEST.TXT File length: 0, but it isn't actually there. If I try to open it from notepad or just look in explorer its not there. –  Ricky Jones Mar 11 '12 at 22:13

10 Answers 10

Perhaps file stream eventually was not released by OS so file system does not reflect recent changes? Just try explicitly closing a new file stream after creation:

FileInfo fi = new FileInfo("C:\\TEST.TXT");
using (var stream = fi.Create());

Please let us know whether it works or not since it is a bit crazy idea ;) I believe problem could be even simple

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, didn't work unfortunately :( –  Ricky Jones Mar 11 '12 at 22:34
    
@RickyJones: have you shared exact source code you are using? perhaps you ahve removed asoemthing small you considered not important? Please share exact code, perhaps you have something like Console.ReadLine() or whatever what you've skipped when posting here? –  sll Mar 12 '12 at 9:12

Could be a permissions problem. If the user account running vS is different from the one running the command prompt, they may have different permissions for creating files. Look in your Windows event viewer to see if the error is reported there. Then, use try-catch, as Marc suggested.

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I suspect that User Account Control is redirecting the file creation to the shadow copy directory; under VS you're running as an administrator, so the file creation is not redirected.

Have a look for the file in the VirtualStore directory. That will be at

C:\Users\YourUserNameHere\AppData\Local\VirtualStore

The actual folder will be something like

C:\Users\YourUserNameHere\AppData\Local\VirtualStore\C

To solve this problem, you could change the program so that it writes the file to a location intended for user data; an obvious choice would be the Documents folder. You could also run the application with administrator privileges. There are at least three ways to do this:

  • Right-click the executable and choose "Run as Administrator"
  • Run the executable with a shortcut, after checking the "Run as Administrator" check box in the shortcut's properties dialogue
  • Use either method above to open an "Administrator" command prompt session; then run the application normally by entering its name at the command prompt.
share|improve this answer

Just a tip. When you work with files, always do it in a try catch. You never know what could happen like in your case.

Do you run the cmd as administrator? Maybe you don't have the rights to create the file.

Also add a try catch and return the error in the console. It would help you to figure out your problem if running as administrator doesn't work.

        try
        {            
            your code..
        }

        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} Exception caught.", e);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but no exception is being thrown. –  Ricky Jones Mar 11 '12 at 22:33
    
Do you run the cmd as administrator? –  Marc Mar 12 '12 at 1:17

You need to call fi.Refresh(); in order to have the FileSystemInfo re-examine the base object, otherwise, it will always return false.

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Try to close the file as follow:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace ExampleApplication {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            FileInfo fi = new FileInfo("C:\\TEST.TXT");
            fi.Create();
            fi.Close();
            Console.WriteLine("File exists: {0}", fi.Exists);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
FileInfo does not provide Close method, perhaps you mean FileStream.Close()? –  sll Mar 11 '12 at 22:23

I don't know the reason of this, but why won't you try this:

if(!File.Exists("C:\\TEST.TXT"))
{
   File.Create("C:\\TEST.TXT");
   Console.WriteLine("File exists");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Fun ;) It would print File does not exists when file actually exists ;) –  sll Mar 11 '12 at 22:13
    
you mean it created a file but writed 'File does not exists'? –  GaaRa Mar 11 '12 at 22:14
    
Just read your else block, it will run in case when File.Exists("C:\\TEST.TXT") == true –  sll Mar 11 '12 at 22:15
    
oh,.. yes, my mistake =) –  GaaRa Mar 11 '12 at 22:20

You're doing this the wrong way. You have to dispose the file object after you're done with it. To create an empty file in .NET, I'd suggest you do it like this:

using (File.Create("C:\\TEST.TXT"));

or like this:

File.Create("C:\\TEST.TXT").Dispose();

Alternatively you could just modify your fi.Create() to:

fi.Create().Dispose();

It is likely that Visual Studio Debugger is automatically cleaning up your mess for you by properly disposing all objects when you stop the debugging.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, before trying this code, I'd suggest you restart your PC just to make sure windows doesn't try to use the same memory space again. –  Chibueze Opata Mar 11 '12 at 22:47
use the following code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace ExampleApplication {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
         if(!File.Exists("C:\\TEST.TXT"))
         {
             GC.Collect();
             GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
             fi.Create();
             fi.Close();
             Console.WriteLine("File exists: {0}", fi.Exists);
        }
      }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This is a simple solution,

I ran you code and got a UnauthorizedAccessException which is a security exception you do not have the right security to save a file in the root folder (C:\)

if you change it to FileInfo("TEXT.TXT"); instead of C:\TEXT.TXT it will work

Btw, you cant use a using statement as FileInfo doesn't implement IDisposable interface.

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