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Say I have declared a 2d array like

char* array[30][30];

and what I am putting into it are strings, not all of length 30, like

char* string="test string";

I want to put each char of string into array starting at array[i][0]

I am trying to avoid using a loop to go over each character, is there a more efficient way of doing this?

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4  
you've asked 7 questions and have not accepted one of them? –  Dan Kanze Mar 11 '12 at 22:44
1  
this syntax is so wrong it hurts, you're making a pointer to a char type value, then you instantiate as a physical 2d array... –  Shingetsu Mar 11 '12 at 22:45
    
please read this when you get a chance‌​. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 11 '12 at 22:48
    
Oh!! I was wondering what that 0% meant lol –  spatara Mar 11 '12 at 22:57
    
@spatara now you are one hundred percent (lucky bastard) –  Oddant Mar 11 '12 at 23:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You mean like:

strcpy(array[i], string):

I assume you also meant to declare your 2D array with:

char array[30][30];
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oh yea, that's right! –  spatara Mar 11 '12 at 22:53

A 2 dimensional array of strings doesn't make such sense...

writing :

char * array[30];

is already a 2 dimensional array in a way.

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To clarify, I do not want a 2d array of strings, I want to put each char in the string into my 2d array of chars –  spatara Mar 11 '12 at 23:02
    
@spatara ok but to clarify char * array[30] will create an array of string but a string is also an array of char so you are like scratching your head for nothing cause to access an element of the structure I wrote you can write it like : array[21][0]. which means the first char of the 21th string on the abscissa –  Oddant Mar 11 '12 at 23:25

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