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On the original InterviewStreet Codesprint, there's a question about counting the number of ones in the two's complement representations of the numbers between a and b inclusive. I was able to pass all of the test cases for accuracy using iteration, but I was only able to pass two in the correct amount of time. There was hint that mentioned finding a recurrence relation, so I switched to recursion, but it ended up taking the same amount of time. So can anyone find a faster way to do this than the code I've provided? The first number of the input file is the test cases in the file. I've provided a sample input file after the code.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Solution {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        int numCases = scanner.nextInt();
        for (int i = 0; i < numCases; i++) {
            int a = scanner.nextInt();
            int b = scanner.nextInt();
            System.out.println(count(a, b));
        }
    }

    /**
     * Returns the number of ones between a and b inclusive
     */
    public static int count(int a, int b) {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = a; i <= b; i++) {
            if (i < 0)
                count += (32 - countOnes((-i) - 1, 0));
            else
                count += countOnes(i, 0);
        }

        return count;
    }

    /**
     * Returns the number of ones in a
     */
    public static int countOnes(int a, int count) {
        if (a == 0)
            return count;
        if (a % 2 == 0)
            return countOnes(a / 2, count);
        else
            return countOnes((a - 1) / 2, count + 1);
    }
}

Input:

3
-2 0
-3 4
-1 4

Output:
63
99
37
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Did you try this trick? –  Yu-Han Lyu Mar 12 '12 at 0:46

1 Answer 1

A first step is to replace

public static int countOnes(int a, int count) {
    if (a == 0)
        return count;
    if (a % 2 == 0)
        return countOnes(a / 2, count);
    else
        return countOnes((a - 1) / 2, count + 1);
}

which recurs to a depth of log2 a, with a faster implementation, for example the famous bit-twiddling

public static int popCount(int n) {
    // count the set bits in each bit-pair
    // 11 -> 10, 10 -> 01, 0* -> 0*
    n -= (n >>> 1) & 0x55555555;
    // count bits in each nibble
    n = ((n >>> 2) & 0x33333333) + (n & 0x33333333);
    // count bits in each byte
    n = ((n >> 4) & 0x0F0F0F0F) + (n & 0x0F0F0F0F);
    // accumulate the counts in the highest byte and shift
    return (0x01010101 * n) >> 24;
    // Java guarantees wrap-around, so we can use int here,
    // in C, one would need to use unsigned or a 64-bit type
    // to avoid undefined behaviour
}

which uses four shifts, five bitwise ands, one subtraction, two additions and one multiplication for a total of thirteen very cheap instructions.

But unless the ranges are very small, one can do much better than counting the bits of each individual number.

Let us consider non-negative numbers first. The numbers from 0 to 2k-1 all have up to k bits set. Every bit is set in exactly half of these, so the total number of bits is k*2^(k-1). Now let 2^k <= a < 2^(k+1). The total number of bits in the numbers 0 <= n <= a is the sum of the bits in the numbers 0 <= n < 2^k and the bits in the numbers 2^k <= n <= a. The first count is, as we saw above, k*2^(k-1). In the second part, we have a - 2^k + 1 numbers, each of them has the 2k-bit set, and ignoring the leading bit, the bits of these are the same as in the numbers 0 <= n <= (a - 2^k), so

totalBits(a) = k*2^(k-1) + (a - 2^k + 1) + totalBits(a - 2^k)

Now for the negative numbers. In twos complement, -(n+1) = ~n, so the numbers -a <= n <= -1 are the complements of the numbers 0 <= m <= (a-1) and the total number of set bits in the numbers -a <= n <= -1 is a*32 - totalBits(a-1).

For the total number of bits in a range a <= n <= b, we have to add or subtract, depending on whether both ends of the range have opposite or the same sign.

// if n >= 0, return the total of set bits for
// the numbers 0 <= k <= n
// if n < 0, return the total of set bits for
// the numbers n <= k <= -1
public static long totalBits(int n){
    if (n < 0) {
        long a = -(long)n;
        return (a*32 - totalBits((int)(a-1)));
    }
    if (n < 3) return n;
    int lg = 0, mask = n;
    // find the highest set bit in n and its position
    while(mask > 1){
        ++lg;
        mask >>= 1;
    }
    mask = 1 << lg;
    // total bit count for 0 <= k < 2^lg
    long total = 1L << lg-1;
    total *= lg;
    // add number of 2^lg bits
    total += n+1-mask;
    // add number of other bits for 2^lg <= k <= n
    total += totalBits(n-mask);
    return total;
}

// return total set bits for the numbers a <= n <= b
public static long totalBits(int a, int b) {
    if (b < a) throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid range");
    if (a == b) return popCount(a);
    if (b == 0) return totalBits(a);
    if (b < 0) return totalBits(a) - totalBits(b+1);
    if (a == 0) return totalBits(b);
    if (a > 0) return totalBits(b) - totalBits(a-1);
    // Now a < 0 < b
    return totalBits(a) + totalBits(b);
}
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