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I'm trying to split a string (a persons name) into components: prefix (Dr, Mr, Miss, etc), given, middle, family, and suffix (Jr, III, etc...).

Prefixes and suffixes can be a known list of options.

Edge cases for double barreled family names like 'da Vinci' or 'di Caprio' don't really bother me too much. The da's and di's will just be dropped in the middle name, or if a middle is given (i.e. 4 names are found that don't match a prefix or suffix) then everything after the second name is dropped in the family name.

I'm thinking about writing the regex myself... but before I go and reinvent the wheel, I wonder if anyone has something that works I can use?

Thanks.

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Since you don't mind about 'da Vinci' etc, why don't you just split on space? –  mathematical.coffee Mar 11 '12 at 23:35
    
okay, if you know Mr Leo di Caprio you can use something like this: /(\w+\s+)+/ so, now, after this regex, you can sort string array and move each string for each category. –  gaussblurinc Mar 11 '12 at 23:36
    
Thanks. /(\w+\s+)+/ would work. Though I'm sure not everyone is going to enter a prefix and suffix. Nor would they always enter a middle name or last name. Yes, I could just split the words and sort it out later, but that's what regex is for. If theres a cool way of doing it in one regex test that would be awesome. It would have to recognize and sort correctly: Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio, Mr. Leo DiCaprio, Leo DiCaprio, Lio, Mr. DiCaprio, Leo Jr., Leonardo DiCaprio III, etc... –  nicholas Mar 12 '12 at 4:39
    
which language do you intend to use for your regex ? (java , c# ...) Have you got a few examples and the output expected ? –  Stephan Sep 14 '12 at 14:09
    
I also have the same issue, could someone help me out? –  user3349592 Mar 20 at 3:31

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