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I have class 'Settings' which stores my app's settings in static variables (to be "visible" from anywhere in app) and I would like to have functionality of saving/loading it.

simplified Settings class:

@XmlRootElement
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.NONE)
public class Settings {
    @XmlElement
    private static int option = 0;

    private Settings() {
    }

    public static int getOption() {
        return value;
    }
    public static void setOption(int option) {
        Settings.value = option;
    }
}

Code used to marshal:

public static void main(String[] args) throws JAXBException {
    JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Settings.class);
    Marshaller m = context.createMarshaller();
    m.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
    m.marshal(new Settings(), new File("c:\\test\\test.xml"));
}

And output xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<settings>
    <option>**0**</option>
</settings>

Now the problem: when I change value of static int option by calling Settings.setOption(5); as shown below and do unmarshal of the previously marshaled option (which was 0), the resulting Settings object has value of Settings.option same as the current Settings.option, which is 5.

Settings.setValue(5);
JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Settings.class);
Settings s2 = (Settings)context.createUnmarshaller().unmarshal(new File("c:\\test\\test.xml"));
// s2.option is 5, but should be 0!

I just hoped that after unmarshalling it would actually set all static variables of Setting to match with new created object "by nature", but it seems not.
Is there any way to achieve such behavior while preserving static variables? Or am I completely wrong about method of doing save/load of app settings? Please, help :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, I just made workaround, see code below:

Settings Class:

public final class SettingsHolder
{

    private SettingsHolder() {
        throw new AssertionError();
    }

    public static Settings settings = new Settings();

    @XmlRootElement
    @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.NONE)
    public final static class Settings
    {

        @XmlElement
        private int option = 0;

        public int getOption() {
            return option;
        }

        public void setOption(int option) {
            this.option = option;
        }

    }

}

Marshal code:

JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(SettingsHolder.Settings.class);
Marshaller m = context.createMarshaller();
m.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
m.marshal(SettingsHolder.settings, new File("c:\\test\\test.xml"));

test.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<settings>
    <option>0</option>
</settings>

Now unmarshal test:

SettingsHolder.settings.setOption(5);
JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(SettingsHolder.Settings.class);

System.out.println("Old Settings: " + SettingsHolder.settings.getOption());
// prints Old Settings: 5

SettingsHolder.settings = (SettingsHolder.Settings)context.createUnmarshaller().unmarshal(new File("c:\\test\\test.xml"));

System.out.println("New Settings: " + SettingsHolder.settings.getOption());
// prints New Settings: 0

Still, have anybody better solution for saving/loading app settings? And what about unmarshalling static variables anyway? My solution is just about not using them.

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After playing around, I made SettingsHolder.Setting instance public static final, initializing it from static {} block from file. If file not exist, it will create new instance of Settings, which are default settings. –  PoloShock Mar 12 '12 at 13:34

I suggest making two sets of variables, one private the other public static.

Use a method to set the private to the static variables.

This is simpler to understand in my opinion, and it requires no change in code to be made outside calling that method and outside of that class itself.

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