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Is there a .? operator in Ruby that checks if an object is nil before calling a method on it?

For instance if I have to code:

if person and person.neighbor and person.neighbor.house and person.neighbor.house.rooms
    person.neighbor.house.rooms.each do |room|
        blah
    end
end

Is there a better way than having to do an if check on everything?

And please don't say "code in such a way that these objects cannot ever be nil", I am getting these things from an API call and can't control it.

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1  
The Law of Demeter may be interesting to you, as your code violates it heavily. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 12 '12 at 0:05
    
    
@AndrewMarshal, I definitely agree. However I can't think of a good way to follow LoD in my case. I am basically making an API call to a 3rd party authentication platform (ie facebook twitter etc) and getting back a huge nested object of information. Within this, I only want to grab 1 piece of info (specifically, the user's education history), which is deeply nested. Unless I write 5 different methods each of which only makes a call to its descendent, I am forced to violate LoD. Maybe there's a better way? –  Razor Storm Mar 12 '12 at 0:12
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Easiest thing to do is use the andand gem, although there are some other, pretty trivially-implemented options, like this, or this, or etc.

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1  
Didn't know about the andand, its cool +1 –  wintersolutions Mar 12 '12 at 0:06
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why not

begin
    person.neighbor.house.rooms.each do |room|
        ...
    end
rescue NameError
    ...
end

Exception handlers are made for handle exception :) So if you depend on someone else code, you should not prevent but handle your code for crash, not to check if everything is ok.

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For second case, checking for does the object have a list of methods or not, you may use try method

require "active_support/core_ext/object/try"
person.try(:neighbor).try(:house).try(:rooms).each do |room|
   blah
end

Or my version of try

class Object
  def try(*args, &block)
    if args.empty? and block_given?
      begin
        instance_eval &block
      rescue NameError => e
        puts e.message + ' ' + e.backtrace.first
      end
    elsif respond_to?(args.first)
      send(*args, &block)
    end
  end
end

Then you can do it in short way:

person.try{neighbor.house.rooms}.each do |room|
   blah
end
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The method you are looking for is nil?

Example:

foo.nil?

For a more elegant approaches to programming defensive against nil values, see my question on the same topic. For example you could write:

person.neighbor.house.rooms.each do |room|
    blah
end
rescue false
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You don't want to rescue arbitrary exceptions, though. –  Dave Newton Mar 12 '12 at 0:01
    
@DaveNewton: If theres something like a nil exception please feel free to edit my answer –  wintersolutions Mar 12 '12 at 0:04
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