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Since the C# using statement is just a syntactic sugar for try/finally{dispose} why does it accept multiple objects ONLY IF THEY ARE OF THE SAME TYPE?

I don't get it since all they need to be is IDisposable. If all of them implement IDisposable it should be fine but it isn't.

Specifically I am used to writing

using (var cmd = new SqlCommand())
{
    using (cmd.Connection)
    {
        // code
    }
}

which I compact into:

using (var cmd = new SqlCommand())
using (cmd.Connection)
{
    // code
}

and I would like to compact furthermore into:

using(var cmd = new SqlCommand(), var con = cmd.Connection)
{
    // code
}

but I can't. I could probably, some would say, write :

using((var cmd = new SqlCommand()).Connection)
{
    // code
}

since all I need to dispose is the connection and not the command but that's besides the point.

share|improve this question
    
I think this is actually a good idea. I would think it's just something that simply hasn't been implemented yet. I'd be surprised if there's an actual specific reason why this doesn't exist. I could be wrong though... –  BFree Jun 8 '09 at 17:57
2  
Am I learning something new here? What's with the second, non-assigned using statement in the top example? Does that item become the scope? –  spender Jun 8 '09 at 17:57
    
@spender: the argument of using needs to be an expression that can be converted to IDisposable. A declaration is (just one) such an expression. –  Henk Holterman Jun 8 '09 at 18:06
    
@spender: Yes, you (probably) learned something new. The syntax of using is using(IDisposableInstance) statement;. Just as Henk Holterman said an assignment is an operation whose result (often unused but here used) is the value assigned. –  Andrei Rînea Jun 8 '09 at 18:12
1  
Inspired by your question I tried the following idea: stackoverflow.com/questions/974484/… –  VVS Jun 10 '09 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can do this though:

using (IDisposable cmd = new SqlCommand(), con = (cmd as SqlCommand).Connection)
{
   var command = (cmd as SqlCommand);
   var connection = (con as SqlConnection);
   //code
}

Perhaps that would be satisfactory to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks nice, until you expand the //code line –  Henk Holterman Jun 8 '09 at 18:11
1  
@Henk I'm not following you. –  Joseph Jun 8 '09 at 18:12
    
This is the closest workaround I've seen so far. However I'll need to cast the cmd back to SqlCommand in the block in order to manipulate it. The same with "con" which I'll have to open in order to do my job. –  Andrei Rînea Jun 8 '09 at 18:13
    
@Andrei You're right, I'll update my answer to reflect what you're talking about. –  Joseph Jun 8 '09 at 18:13
1  
@Henk Oh I understand. I agree. I prefer to use the stacked usings myself as well. I was just giving an answer to his question of how you could do what he was trying to do. –  Joseph Jun 8 '09 at 18:22

There's no particularly good technical reason; we could have come up with a syntax that allowed multiple declarations of nonhomogeneous types. Given that we did not, and there already is a perfectly good, clear, understandable and fairly concise mechanism for declaring nested using blocks of different types, we're unlikely to add a new syntactic sugar just to save a few keystrokes.

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11  
Oh I see... to protect us from syntactic diabetes we will not add any more syntactic sugar :P –  Andrei Rînea Jun 8 '09 at 20:56
    
syntactic diabetes.. muahah :) –  VVS Jun 30 '10 at 12:54
1  
So in other words. Meh! Shrugs shoulders –  Maxim Gershkovich Apr 11 '11 at 14:56
1  
But wait, there's a lot of things in C# that "saves a few keystrokes". In combination, they all save a lot of keystrokes. The more the merrier! MSIL + sugar = C#. –  Camilo Martin Feb 10 '13 at 3:36
    
Except that's the whole point of syntactic sugar--saving keystrokes and making things easier on the eyes. –  user1334007 Aug 20 at 20:27

Other variable declarations in C# only allow you to declare multiple variables of the same type in the same statement; I don't see why using headers should be different.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes and no. There's nothing stopping you from doing : IComparable c1, c2; and then later in your code have c1 and c2 be totally different concrete types that implement IComparable. That's what the OP is pointing out, all they need to be is IDisposable... –  BFree Jun 8 '09 at 17:58
    
Sure, but you can do it in a using statement too with IDisposable, for example, this is legal: using (IDisposable a = new SqlCommand(), b = new SqlConnection()) –  mquander Jun 8 '09 at 18:01
    
BFree, that's exactly what mquander is saying, isn't it? using (IDisposable x = new Connection(), y = new Command()) would work but is rather useless. The type of the reference counts. –  Henk Holterman Jun 8 '09 at 18:03
    
Ok, misread your answer. Got it now... –  BFree Jun 8 '09 at 18:12

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