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I am reading through O'Reilly's Programming Perl, 3rd Edition, and the text states that instead of using the ambiguous search pattern /$foo[bar]/, one should instead use /${foo[bar]}/ so that Perl doesn't mistake [bar] for a character class. Am I missing something, or are both of these statements syntactically incorrect due to the fact that they are trying to index into an array using a bareword string? I've checked the book's errata online and can't find any mention of this being a mistake in the book. Is there some scenario that I am overlooking in which that code could be valid?

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You could just put them both in a program and find out if they compile. perl's -c switch will tell you if they are syntactically invalid. –  brian d foy Mar 12 '12 at 5:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I am reading through O'Reilly's Programming Perl, 3rd Edition, and the text states that instead of using the ambiguous search pattern /$foo[bar]/, one should instead use /${foo[bar]}/ so that Perl doesn't mistake [bar] for a character class. Am I missing something, or are both of these statements syntactically incorrect due to the fact that they are trying to index into an array using a bareword string?

Yes, you’re missing something: bar can be a function call:

$ perl -Mstrict -E 'sub bar() { 0 } say "foo" =~ /$ARGV[bar]/ || "FAIL"' foo
FAIL

$ perl -Mstrict -E 'sub bar() { 0 } say "foo" =~ /${ARGV[bar]}/ || "FAIL"' foo
1

$ perl -MO=Deparse -Mstrict -E 'sub bar() { 0 } say "foo" =~ /${ARGV[bar]}/ || "FAIL"' foo
sub bar () { 0 }
use strict 'refs';
BEGIN {
    $^H{'feature_unicode'} = q(1);
    $^H{'feature_say'} = q(1);
    $^H{'feature_state'} = q(1);
    $^H{'feature_switch'} = q(1);
}
say 'foo' =~ /$ARGV[0]/ || 'FAIL';
-e syntax OK

The exact quote, from page 73 of Programming Perl, 4th edition, is:

Within search patterns, which also undergo double-quotish interpolation, there is an unfortunate ambiguity: is /$foo[bar]/ to be interpreted as /${foo}[bar]/ (where [bar] is a character class for the regular expression), or as /${foo[bar]}/ (where [bar] is the subscript to array @foo)? If @foo doesn’t otherwise exist, it’s obviously a character class. If @foo exists, Perl takes a good guess about [bar] and is almost always right. If it does guess wrong, or if you’re just plain paranoid, you can force the correct interpretation with braces as shown earlier. Even if you’re merely prudent, it’s probably not a bad idea.

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I think I get it, but the text that you quoted mentions nothing of a function call (also, functions haven't been covered yet at that point in the text). Surely it is not good practice to define functions that return integers so that arrays can be indexed using function names, is it? Or is there some situation that frequently arises where this makes sense? Also, can you point me to somewhere in the book where indexing an array in this manner is explained? –  clarkb86 Mar 12 '12 at 2:43
    
@clarkb86 Yes, there is a situation where it makes sense. When you are using an array for an object, and using various slots to hold distinct things. Normally you’d just use a hash, but sometimes an array gets used, and when it does, it’s common to have use named constants for the indices. The point is that this is technically ambiguous, and that sometimes you will have to use the workaround. We have to explain it here, not wait till we talk about user-defined functions, because here is where we are talking about array interpolation. –  tchrist Mar 12 '12 at 2:49
    
F.e., all of the @_ indexing by constant in poe.perl.org/?POE_Cookbook/Chat_Server –  Julian Fondren Mar 12 '12 at 2:56
    
say is nice, but sometimes -le 'print makes for less distraction in an example –  ysth Mar 12 '12 at 3:25
    
or even -e 'print ..., "\n"' –  ysth Mar 12 '12 at 3:28
sub bar { 1 }

Alas, I can't submit that alone; it's too short for SO. So, this is one way to express a constant in Perl. E.g., sub MAGIC_NUMBER { 0x7774 }

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+1, but IMHO the superior idiom is use constant bar => 1; (which has the same effect, but makes it more explicit that bar is a constant function). –  ruakh Mar 12 '12 at 2:06
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@Alan, if you want to know what 2+2 comes out to, '4' is a drive-by answer. It's also the answer. It'd be nice if every question and answer on SO were a page out of the book of wisdom, but you don't get there by answering unasked questions ("What is addition?", "Who invented the 'plus' sign?", "What does '2+2=1' mean in polyamorous communities?"). –  Julian Fondren Mar 12 '12 at 3:19
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(I had to delete my first comment, I don't know what happened there.) The minimum-length requirement encourages you to think about what additional information you might include. But useful information only, please. If the question is so simple that a drive-by answer is all you can say about it, maybe it's the question that doesn't belong here. ;) –  Alan Moore Mar 12 '12 at 9:32

bar could be a function:

perl -le 'sub bar () { 1 } my @foo = qw(hello world); print m/${foo[bar]}/ ? "$_ -> TRUE" : "$_ -> FALSE" for qw(hello world)'
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