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I am trying to make sure I am following correct memory management in my current application. I have two questions though.

(1) Should I release [self.myString release] in dealloc()? If not when will this get released?

(2) Should I set _myString = nil in the viewDidUnload()?

@interface ViewController : UIViewController
{
    NSString *_myString;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *myString;

@end


@implementation ViewController

@synthesize myString = _myString;

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.myString = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"Hello World"];

    NSLog(@"%@", self.myString);
}

- (void)viewDidUnload
{
    self.myString = nil;
    [super viewDidUnload];
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [_myString release];
    [super dealloc];
}

@end
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closed as too broad by Josh Caswell, Midhun MP, Janak Nirmal, Monolo, Undo Mar 2 at 0:01

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I highly recommend you switch to ARC (Automatic Reference Counting) once this feature is enabled the compiler releases everything for you, eliminating the need to release anything yourself. –  0x7fffffff Mar 12 '12 at 2:14
    
This is not an option, but thanks for the suggestion. –  Vikings Mar 12 '12 at 2:16
    
Alright, good luck! –  0x7fffffff Mar 12 '12 at 2:16
    
Hey MDT! How can ARC be made compatible with iOS<5.0 devices? –  Ishank Dubey Jun 4 '12 at 11:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is fine. There is no need to do anything else.

(1) Should I release [self.myString release] in dealloc()? If not when will this get released?

self.myString returns the same object as _myString. Since you already do [_myString release] once, you should not release it again.

(2) Should I set _myString = nil in the viewDidUnload()?

Same situation. Your self.myString = nil already releases _myString and sets it to nil. There is no need to do it again.

You seem to be thinking that there are two separate objects, _myString and self.myString. That is not the case. All that @synthesize myString = _myString does is create two accessor methods, which are effectively the same as:

- (NSString*)myString { return _myString; }

- (void)setMyString:(NSString*)newValue
{
    if (newValue != _myString) {
        [_myString release];
        _myString = [newValue retain];
    }
}

Also, x = self.myString is the same as x = [self myString], and self.myString = x is the same as [self setMyString:x].

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Is it better practice to release one over the other [self.myString release] or [_myString release] in the dealloc method, or since they both do the same it doesn't matter? –  Vikings Mar 12 '12 at 2:35
    
It's better to do [_myString release]. It's possible that, in a subclass of your object, somebody implemented an override of -myString or -setMyString: with different behavior. Doing [self.myString release] or self.myString = nil would call those overrides after the subclass's -dealloc had happened, which would be unexpected. It's unlikely, but why risk it? –  Kurt Revis Mar 12 '12 at 2:46
    
Thanks a lot, that cleared it up for me. –  Vikings Mar 12 '12 at 2:50

For every alloc there should be a release, unless object is autoreleased. Looking at documentation for initWithString it does not look like it is autoreleased, so this is ok.

self.myString = nil; is a safe practice, yes. This way, you won't accidentally assign a value to myString you don't want to see

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