Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am having an issue where I can't make a data connection to an SQL Server hosted on a different subnet.

SQL Server IP: 192.168.16.15 My IP: 192.168.1.32

I am able to add this server as a server in the Server Explorer in Visual Studio 2008.

I can ping the server fine and the tracert returns

Tracing route to mhia02.OFFICE.local [192.168.16.15]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  mhiav202.office.local [192.168.1.9]
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  mhia02.office.local [192.168.16.15]

Trace complete.

The SQL Server does allows remote connections.

In Visual Studio 2008 when trying to test the connection it says "Timeout expired. The timeout period elapsed prior to completion of the operation or the server is not responding."

SQL Server Version: 2008 Server OS: Windows Web Server 2008 R2 64bit My OS: Windows Vista 64bit

edit

Shared Memory, Named Pipes and TCP/IP is enabled in the network configuration settings.

edit 2

The issue was that the port 1433 wasn't opened in the firewall.

share|improve this question
1  
maybe your workstation is configured to use shared memory or name pipe to connect to sql server, you can use "Client Configuration Utility" to check this setting. – hago Mar 12 '12 at 3:18
    
Can you telnet to the server on the port that SQL is running on (1433)? Sometimes a firewall will allow ping, but block the port that SQL listens on... – Michael Fredrickson Mar 12 '12 at 3:47
    
Thanks Michael that worked! – Rambomst Mar 12 '12 at 5:15
    
@Rambomst Glad that worked... I re-posted my comment as an answer. – Michael Fredrickson Mar 12 '12 at 18:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try to telnet to the server on the port that SQL is running on (1433). Sometimes a firewall will allow ping, but block the port that SQL listens on.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.