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The problem is very obvious so I will just show you some code:)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
char *test1()
{
    static char c;
    char *p;
    p = &c;
    printf("p[%08x] : %s\n", (unsigned int)p, p);
    return p;
}

void *test2()
{
    static char i;
    char *buf;
    int counter = 0;
    for(buf = (char *)&i ; ;counter += 8)
    {
        memset(buf + counter, 0xff, 8);
        printf("write %d bytes to static area!\n", counter);
    }
}

int main()
{
    char *p;
    p = test1();
    strcpy(p, "lol i asd");
    p = test1();
    strcpy(p, "sunus again!");
    p = test1();
    strcpy(p, "sunus again! i am hacking this!!asdfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff");
    p = test1();
    test2();
    return 0;
}

First I wrote test1(). As you can see, those strcpys should cause a segment fault, because it's obviously accessing an illegal memory area. I knew some basic about static variable, but this is just strange for me.

Then I wrote test2(). finally, it caused a segment fault, after it wrote almost 4k bytes.

So, I wonder how to avoid this kind of error (static variable overflow) from happening?

Why can I access those static memory areas? I know that they aren't in the stack, nor heap.

PS. Maybe I am not describing my problem clearly. I have got some years of C programming experience; I know what will happen when this is not static. Now static changes almost everything and I want to know why.

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1  
Your question would be easier to read if you would use your Shift key. –  Eric J. Mar 12 '12 at 4:44
    
@Eric J.: Or learn to use it properly, at least. –  BoltClock Mar 12 '12 at 4:45
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4 Answers

Undefined behaviour is just that - undefined. It might look like it's working, it might crash, it might steal your lunch money. Just don't do it.

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i know, it's just not normal. not static variable will cause error right after error happens, but this, just hides.. –  sunus Mar 12 '12 at 4:49
    
There is no guarantee that anything that looks like an error will happen regardless of the storage class you happen to be using for your variables. –  Carl Norum Mar 12 '12 at 4:50
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Segmentation fault occurs when you exceed memory page, which is 4kB, so with luck you can write full 4k before it happens, and if next page is already utilized - even that isn't guaranteed. Gcc's stack protector could help sometimes, but not in that case. Valgrind could help too. None of these are guaranteed. You better take care of it yourself.

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You cannot avoid the potential for overwriting memory that you did not allocate in C.

As to the manner of the failure... When, where and how your application crashes or otherwise misbehaves depends entirely on your compiler, the compiler flags, and the random state memory was in before your program started executing. You are accessing memory you are not supposed to, and it's completely undefined in C what impact that access will have on the operating environment.

Languages that manage memory (e.g. Java, C#) do that for you, but of course there is a cost to the bounds checking.

You can certainly use memory management libraries (replacements for malloc/free/new/delete) that will attempt to detect improper memory management.

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You avoid the problem by knowing how big your memory areas are and by not writing outside the boundaries of those areas. There's no other reliable way to deal with the issue.

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i mean, in test1, i can change static char c to static char c[2]; then let p = c. and everything remain the same. –  sunus Mar 12 '12 at 7:57
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