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I wrote a very basic class to play with the new ARC and accessor methods, just to get a feel for how they work. From what I've read, the ARC should replace manual reference counting, right? But I get a problem with my accessor methods.

Here's my Interface/Implementation for my Container class:

// interface
@interface Container : NSObject {
   NSMutableString *string;
}

- (NSMutableString *)string;
- (void)setString:(NSMutableString *)aString;

@end

// implementation
@implementation Container

- (NSMutableString *)string
{
   return string;
}

- (void)setString:(NSMutableString *)aString
{
   string = aString;
}

- (NSString *)description
{
   return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"inner string = %@", string];
}

@end

It seems alright to me, all the reference counting details are handled by the ARC I believe. The problem occurs in the main method:

Container *myContainer = [[Container alloc] init];
  NSMutableString *aString = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@"Hello!"];

[myContainer setString:aString];

NSLog(@"%@", myContainer);

[aString setString:@"Bye!"];

NSLog(@"%@", myContainer);

aString = [myContainer string];
[aString setString:@"Bye, again!"];

NSLog(@"%@", myContainer);

It seems that aString points to the string member variable, which means when I change aString I also change string with it. I tried releasing aString from the main() method but then I get a compiler error. How do I fix this? Do I use the copy method, or is there another way?

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7  
Variables under ARC environment will be created with a strong reference. If you need to copy a value stored in a pointer (as it seems to be the case above), you have explicitly declare your property as copy or create a setter method that copies the value stored in your variable (this has always been the case and ARC doesn't/shouldn't affect it). –  Rog Mar 12 '12 at 5:10
    
So I should write this: string = [aString copy]? That'll fix the problem right? –  rcplusplus Mar 12 '12 at 5:12
    
You don't call release/retain/dealloc under ARC, let the compiler do it for you. –  neevek Mar 12 '12 at 5:20
1  
Interestingly [aString copy] will return an immutable NSString. You would probably want to use [aString mutableCopy]. –  NJones Mar 12 '12 at 5:21

1 Answer 1

rcplusplus,

You asked:

It seems that aString points to the string member variable, which means when I change aString I also change string with it. I tried releasing aString from the main() method but then I get a compiler error. How do I fix this? Do I use the copy method, or is there another way?

The way to release any ARC item is to set it to nil. This tells the compiler you are through with this item. It is released in the assignment.

Example:

[myContainer setString: nil];
myContainer.string = nil;

or, from within your class:

string = nil;

Andrew

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