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The values in my enum are words that need to have spaces in them, but enums can't have spaces in their values so it's all bunched up. I want to override toString() to add these spaces where I tell it to.

I also want the enum to provide the correct enum when I use valueOf() on the same string that I added the spaces to.

For example:

public enum RandomEnum
{
     StartHere,
     StopHere
}

Call toString() on RandomEnum whose value is StartHere returns string "Start Here". Call valueof() on that same string ("Start Here") returns enum value StartHere.

How can I do this?

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2  
Add the "Java" tag to get more comments/answers. –  Java42 Mar 12 '12 at 6:02
    
possible duplicate of Implementing toString on Java enums –  Steve Chambers Feb 5 at 9:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 71 down vote accepted

You can try out this code. Since you cannot override valueOf method you have to define a custom method (getEnum in the sample code below) which returns the value that you need and change your client to use this method instead.

public enum RandomEnum {

    StartHere("Start Here"),
    StopHere("Stop Here");

    private String value;

    RandomEnum(String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return this.getValue();
    }

    public static RandomEnum getEnum(String value) {
        for(RandomEnum v : values())
            if(v.getValue().equalsIgnoreCase(value)) return v;
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }
}
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Worked great! Thanks. –  WildBamaBoy Mar 12 '12 at 23:56
2  
getEnum could be shortened if you do the following: v.getValue().equals(value); the null check can be omitted. –  rtcarlson Mar 27 at 18:45
    
Thanks a lot!!! –  Muhannad A.Alhariri May 15 at 5:57
    
You can also lazily build a map and reuse it, but beware of threading issues while building it. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jun 30 at 9:07
1  
does not work in a scenarios where you cannot change the calling of valueOf() method to getValue() e.g. when you define certain fields via Hibernate annotations to map to enum values –  davidgale Sep 19 at 11:06

You can use a static Map in your enum that maps Strings to enum constants. Use it in a 'getEnum' static method. This skips the need to iterate through the enums each time you want to get one from its String value.

public enum RandomEnum {

    StartHere("Start Here"),
    StopHere("Stop Here");

    private final String strVal;
    private RandomEnum(String strVal) {
        this.strVal = strVal;
    }

    public static RandomEnum getEnum(String strVal) {
        if(!strValMap.containsKey(strVal)) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unknown String Value: " + strVal);
        }
        return strValMap.get(strVal);
    }

    private static final Map<String, RandomEnum> strValMap;
    static {
        final Map<String, RandomEnum> tmpMap = Maps.newHashMap();
        for(final RandomEnum en : RandomEnum.values()) {
            tmpMap.put(en.strVal, en);
        }
        strValMap = ImmutableMap.copyOf(tmpMap);
    }
}

Just make sure the static initialization of the map occurs below the declaration of the enum constants.

BTW - that 'ImmutableMap' type is from the Google guava API, and I definitely recommend it in cases like this.

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I don't think your going to get valueOf("Start Here") to work. But as far as spaces...try the following...

static private enum RandomEnum {
    R("Start There"), 
    G("Start Here"); 
    String value;
    RandomEnum(String s) {
        value = s;
    }
}

System.out.println(RandomEnum.G.value);
System.out.println(RandomEnum.valueOf("G").value);

Start Here
Start Here
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The following is a nice generic alternative to valueOf()

public static RandomEnum getEnum(String value) {
  for (RandomEnum re : RandomEnum.values()) {
    if (re.description.compareTo(value) == 0) {
      return re;
    }
  }
  throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid RandomEnum value: " + value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
is usage of compareTo() more elegant than equals() for Strings? –  Betlista Jan 27 at 14:51
    
Elegance not an issue - I agree that .equals() would work fine. Could use == if you like. (Although good reason not to is should you ever replace the enum with a class.) –  exception Feb 17 at 14:02

Try this, but i don't sure that will work every where :)

public enum MyEnum {
    A("Start There"),
    B("Start Here");

    MyEnum(String name) {
        try {
            Field fieldName = getClass().getSuperclass().getDeclaredField("name");
            fieldName.setAccessible(true);
            fieldName.set(this, name);
            fieldName.setAccessible(false);
        } catch (Exception e) {}
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice...really nice....impressed :) –  Mak Oct 2 at 11:27

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