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I'm very new to Arduino. I have much more experience with Java and ActionScript 3. I'm working on building a light meter out of an Arduino Uno and a TAOS TSL235R light-to-frequency converter.

I can only find a tuturial using a different sensor, so I am working my way through converting what I need to get it all to work (AKA some copy and paste, shamefully, but I'm new to this).

There are three parts: this is the first tutorial of the series Arduino and the Taos TSL230R Light Sensor: Getting Started.

The photographic conversion: Arduino and the TSL230R: Photographic Conversions.

At first, I could return values for the frequency created by the TSL235R sensor, but once I tried to add the code for photographic conversions I only get zero returned, and none of the funcions outside of the main loop seem to fire being that my Serial.Println() doesn't return anything.

I am more concerned with making the functions fire than if my math is perfect. In ActionScript and Java there are event listeners for functions and such, do I need to declare the function for it to fire in C/C++?

Basically, how can I make sure all my functions fire in the C programming language?

My Arduino Sketch:

// TSL230R Pin Definitions
#define TSL_FREQ_PIN 2

// Our pulse counter for our interrupt
unsigned long pulse_cnt = 0;

// How often to calculate frequency
// 1000 ms = 1 second
#define READ_TM 1000

// Two variables used to track time
unsigned long cur_tm = millis();
unsigned long pre_tm = cur_tm;

// We'll need to access the amount of time passed
unsigned int tm_diff = 0;

unsigned long frequency;
unsigned long freq;
float lux;
float Bv;
float Sv;
// Set our frequency multiplier to a default of 1
// which maps to output frequency scaling of 100x.
int freq_mult = 100;

// We need to measure what to divide the frequency by:
//   1x sensitivity =   10,
//  10x sensitivity =  100,
// 100x sensitivity = 1000
int calc_sensitivity = 10;


void setup() {
    attachInterrupt(0, add_pulse, RISING);  // Attach interrupt to pin2.
    pinMode(TSL_FREQ_PIN, INPUT); //Send output pin to Arduino
    Serial.begin(9600);  //Start the serial connection with the copmuter.
}//setup


void loop(){
    // Check the value of the light sensor every READ_TM ms and
    // calculate how much time has passed.
    pre_tm   = cur_tm;
    cur_tm   = millis();

    if( cur_tm > pre_tm ) {
        tm_diff += cur_tm - pre_tm;
    }
    else
        if( cur_tm < pre_tm ) {
            // Handle overflow and rollover (Arduino 011)
            tm_diff += ( cur_tm + ( 34359737 - pre_tm ));
        }

    // If enough time has passed to do a new reading...
    if (tm_diff >= READ_TM ) {
        // Reset the ms counter
        tm_diff = 0;

        // Get our current frequency reading
        frequency = get_tsl_freq();

        // Calculate radiant energy
        float uw_cm2 = calc_uwatt_cm2( frequency );

        // Calculate illuminance
        float lux = calc_lux_single( uw_cm2, 0.175 );
    }
    Serial.println(freq);
    delay(1000);
} //Loop


unsigned long  get_tsl_freq() {
    // We have to scale out the frequency --
    // Scaling on the TSL230R requires us to multiply by a factor
    // to get actual frequency.
    unsigned long freq = pulse_cnt * 100;
    // Reset pulse counter
    pulse_cnt = 0;
    return(freq);
    Serial.println("freq");
} //get_tsl_freq


void add_pulse() {
   // Increase pulse count
   pulse_cnt++;
   return;
   Serial.println("Pulse");
}//pulse


float calc_lux_single(float uw_cm2, float efficiency) {
    // Calculate lux (lm/m^2), using standard formula
    //     Xv = Xl * V(l) * Km

    // where Xl is W/m^2 (calculate actual received uW/cm^2, extrapolate from sensor size
    // to whole cm size, then convert uW to W),
    // V(l) = efficiency function (provided via argument) and
    // Km = constant, lm/W @ 555 nm = 683 (555 nm has efficiency function of nearly 1.0).
    //
    // Only a single wavelength is calculated - you'd better make sure that your
    // source is of a single wavelength...  Otherwise, you should be using
    // calc_lux_gauss() for multiple wavelengths.

    // Convert to w_m2
    float w_m2 = (uw_cm2 / (float) 1000000) * (float) 100;
    // Calculate lux
    float lux  = w_m2 * efficiency * (float) 683;
    return(lux);
    Serial.println("Get lux");
} //lux_single


float calc_uwatt_cm2(unsigned long freq) {
    // Get uW observed - assume 640 nm wavelength.
    // Note the divide-by factor of ten -
    // maps to a sensitivity of 1x.
    float uw_cm2 = (float) freq / (float) 10;
    // Extrapolate into the entire cm2 area
    uw_cm2 *= ( (float) 1 / (float) 0.0136 );
    return(uw_cm2);
    Serial.println("Get uw_cm2");
} //calc_uwatt


float calc_ev( float lux, int iso ) {
    // Calculate EV using the APEX method:
    //
    // Ev = Av + Tv = Bv + Sv
    //
    // We'll use the right-hand side for this operation:
    //
    // Bv = log2( B/NK )
    // Sv = log2( NSx )

    float Sv = log( (float) 0.3 * (float) iso ) / log(2);

    float Bv = log( lux / ( (float) 0.3 * (float) 14 ) ) / log(2);

    return( Bv + Sv );
    Serial.println("get Bv+Sv");
}


float calc_exp_tm ( float ev, float aperture  ) {
    // Ev = Av + Tv = Bv + Sv
    // need to determine Tv value, so Ev - Av = Tv
    // Av = log2(Aperture^2)
    // Tv = log2( 1/T ) = log2(T) = 2^(Ev - Av)

    float exp_tm = ev - ( log( pow(aperture, 2) ) / log(2) );

    float exp_log = pow(2, exp_tm);

    return( exp_log  );
    Serial.println("get exp_log");
}


unsigned int calc_exp_ms( float exp_tm ) {
    unsigned int cur_exp_tm = 0;

    // Calculate mS of exposure, given a divisor exposure time.

    if (exp_tm >= 2 ) {
        // Deal with times less than or equal to half a second

        if (exp_tm >= (float) int(exp_tm) + (float) 0.5 ) {
            // Round up
            exp_tm = int(exp_tm) + 1;
        }
        else {
            // Round down
            exp_tm = int(exp_tm);
        }
        cur_exp_tm = 1000 / exp_tm;
    }
    else if( exp_tm >= 1 ) {
        // Deal with times larger than 1/2 second

        float disp_v = 1 / exp_tm;
        // Get first significant digit
        disp_v       = int( disp_v * 10 );
        cur_exp_tm = ( 1000 * disp_v ) / 10;
    }
    else {
       // Times larger than 1 second
       int disp_v = int( (float) 1 / exp_tm);
       cur_exp_tm = 1000 * disp_v;
    }
    return(cur_exp_tm);
    Serial.println("get cur_exp_tm");
}


float calc_exp_aperture( float ev, float exp_tm ) {
    float exp_apt = ev - ( log( (float) 1 / exp_tm ) / log(2) );
    float apt_log = pow(2, exp_apt);

    return( apt_log );
    Serial.println("get apt_log");
}
share|improve this question

That is a lot of code to read, where should I start.

In your loop() you are assigning frequency but printing freq

// get our current frequency reading  
   frequency = get_tsl_freq();  
-- snip --
Serial.println(freq);

in get_tsl_freq() you are creating a local unsigned int freq that hides the global freq and using that for calculation and returning the value, maybe that is also a source of confusion for you. I do not see a reason for frequency and freq to be globals in this code. The function also contains unreachable code, the control will leave the function on return, statements after the return will never be executed.

unsigned long  get_tsl_freq() {  
    unsigned long freq = pulse_cnt * 100;  <-- hides global variable freq  
    // re-set pulse counter  
    pulse_cnt = 0;   
    return(freq);           <-- ( ) not needed
    Serial.println("freq"); <-- Unreachable
}

Reading a bit more I can suggest you pick up a C++ book and read a bit. While your code compiles it is not technically valid C++, you get away with it thanks to the Arduino software that does some mangling and what not to allow using functions before they are declared.

On constants you use in your calculations

float w_m2 = (uw_cm2 / (float) 1000000) * (float) 100; 

could be written as

float w_m2 = (uw_cm2 / 1000000.0f) * 100.0f; 

or even like this because uw_cm2 is a float

float w_m2 = (uw_cm2 / 1000000) * 100;

You also seem to take both approaches to waiting, you have code that calculates and only runs if it has been more than 1000 msec since it was last run, but then you also delay(1000) in the same code, this may not work as expected at all.

share|improve this answer
    
thankyou. this makes things much much more clear. also, i made some of the variables global because sketch would throw a " not defined in this scope" error if i didnt for some reason, even though the tutorial I was reading kept them local – Joseph Aaron Campbell Mar 12 '12 at 7:33
    
i do not argue that i am new to c++. I WILL get a book for c++, I am going to work on this little experiment and post a progress report when I have made some. Thanks for your time r_ahlskog. any other advice is always welcome – Joseph Aaron Campbell Mar 12 '12 at 7:54
    
@JosephAaronCampbell You have done pretty well for not having much C++ background, it is not on the easy end of languages. And there are things I have not touched in my answer, if you look on Stackoverflow I think you will find some recommended reading resources that may even be free. Probably the issue you had was declaring variables in an inner scope and tried to use them outside of it. I always try to help people who have put in some effort. – r_ahlskog Mar 12 '12 at 8:44

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